The Amish

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Robert Snow, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. Robert Snow

    Robert Snow
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    What do you think about the Amish?

    My wife loves to read Christian fiction books about the Amish. Last year we even took a vacation and visited some Amish communities in eastern Ohio. We had a good time and it was interesting to see and even talk to some of these people, but we never did discuss their doctrine. They don't mind the English (a term they use for us Americans who are not Amish), and are friendly toward outsiders. In fact they make good money off of tourism, but I am curious as to what you think about them.

    I would tend to think they hold to more of a works salvation, but I am not sure.
     
  2. Earth Wind and Fire

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    I know next to nothing about Anabaptist doctrine. I know Menno who started the Mennonites was a catholic priest at one time.

    Since my wife is involved in animal rescue, I have learned that the rescue teams take a dim view of Amish people. In Eastern Pa, they keep many puppy mills that I consider cruel & they are very cruel to their horses. My wife can get you more information if you'd care to research that aspect of the Amish.
     
  3. Paul3144

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    I think they should drop their unbiblical legalistic rules and integrate with normal society.
     
  4. North Carolina Tentmaker

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    Who is to say our society is more "normal" than theirs?

    Amish beliefs are very similar to Mennonites, it would be safe to describe them as Mennonite fundamentalists. They both hold to the Mennonite confession of 1632, but the Amish hold to it a bit more literally than other Mennonites. The believe they are a called out community of believers and believe they should be separated from the world. Their gospel of salvation is correct. They often baptize by pouring instead of immersion and they only baptize adults with a profession of faith. Only baptized church members are held to their higher standard of living but they take their separation seriously including shunning and disciplining open sin. While they are very separated as a community, within their congregation they are big on helping one another. Their churches are independent congregations with no central church authority so like Baptists they can vary a great deal from congregation to congregation.

    The Amish doctrine of salvation is no different than ours, it is their application and lifestyle that make them different. While their lifestyle and rules may seem strict to us, they do not believe in earning their salvation or that thier lifestyle is a requirement of salvation. This does not make them legalists by the definition.
     
    #4 North Carolina Tentmaker, Jan 16, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 16, 2011
  5. Salty

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    A church I was interim at (prior to my arrival) had allowed an Amish group to use their baptistery. One interesting note: The Amish did not want anyone to attend the baptism except those from their own church.

    We discussed this when I was there and the policy was established that any baptism would be open to anyone who wanted to attend.
     
  6. preachinjesus

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    The area I grew up in was not far from Amish communities. We would encounter them often.

    Most of the time they were good encounters. They seem to be an honest people, faithfully pursuing God.

    I respect their standards and community. They are cautious about the automatic adoption of technology and other things that might take their focus away. Instead they seek to approach new facets of their community through a time of reflection and consideration. Its not a bad strategy.

    Theologically I believe they are primitive anabaptists. Honestly I don't know much about their beliefs. :)
     
  7. Salty

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  8. Alive in Christ

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    I have great respect for them.

    They have their own *unique ways* but thats their business. They seem very happy with they're simple way of life. They are honest to a "T". And...surprisingly...most of their young ones growing up choose to continue on long after they could move out and live in more modern ways.


    AiC
     
  9. Alive in Christ

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    edit...duplicate
     
  10. Tater77

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    I find being called "English" automatically by them a bit of an insult. Seeing as how I'm of Irish decent and all. :tongue3:
     
  11. Crabtownboy

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  12. Bro. James

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    There is an interesting documentary on the Amish which is currently on NetFlix.

    These groups are good examples of not being conformed to this world. Their history goes back through the anabaptist era. A lot of their faith and practice can be found in the Pauline letters.

    They do not fit into the world of carnal Christianity. Do not know about the puppies--horses do not plow if you mistreat them. The Amish do not offer their children to Molech (abortion).

    "Be not conformed to this world; but be transformed by the renewing of your minds..."

    Selah,

    Bro. James
     
  13. David Lamb

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    I didn't know that the Amish were special in using and "English" to cover Scottish, Welsh and Irish. I have heard and read sevaral Americans doing just that.
     
  14. Earth Wind and Fire

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    Well, you all have a chance to go to Pa & Ohio & join them since they will take you in....they make a good shoofly pie also. Have fun with that.
     
  15. Earth Wind and Fire

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    Obviously in reference to the language of Americans....now if you spoke High German of the 17th Century, they might think differently.
     
  16. North Carolina Tentmaker

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    Now that brings up an interesting question EW&F, not the pie part, but the idea of them taking in outsiders. I would imagine they would be very reluctant to bring in an outsider. While there seperation may be admirable I believe their outreach may be very limited.

    Most baptist churches around here wont make you a real member unless they know your grandmother. I would imagine the Amish communities while friendly to outsiders, would still be very closed to anyone who wanted to join them.

    Does anyone have firsthand knowledge on this?
     
  17. BobinKy

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    [​IMG]



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    ...Bob
     
  18. Squire Robertsson

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    But you speak English rather than their dialect of German.
     
  19. shodan

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    Survivors


    I remember the news reports focusing on the Amish during the Arab oil embargo...life went on as usual for them. And I expect it will continue even when our government goes bankrupt and gasoline becomes unafordable.

    I used to haul hay to them in Wisconsin and was always invited to eat with them. Their devotion and Christian character were a light in a dark world.
     
  20. HAMel

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    The Amish are interested only in themselves. They might live as if it's the 1870's but their take on money is at today's standard. Farmers they are..., but unlike motorized farmers who feed the world, the Amish cannot. They won't serve in our military for which I consider them cowards all the while they hide behind their belief's to justify their anti-military position. Many a young man has died for this country to maintain freedom of which these folks certainly take advantage of and otherwise expect.

    As my wife is from upstate New York and while these folks are all about the country side I just stay clear of them.
     

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