The Five Solas

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by ReformedBaptist, Sep 1, 2007.

  1. ReformedBaptist

    ReformedBaptist
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    Hey all,

    I was curious what the folks here thought, understood, et. about the five solas of the reformation. Given so many different views, et. on things, I wondered how much unity there is on these points. Keep in mind, the five solas are not the 5 points of calvinism.

    Our church's website has a section called "The Reformed Faith" in order to explain the 5 solas and why we call ourselves "reformed" Baptists.

     
  2. larryjf

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    I am in agreement with the 5 solas.
     
  3. Amy.G

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    I agree with the 5 Solas.
     
  4. Jerome

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    I have always understood the Reformed Baptists to be "reformed" in the word's specific sense of "Calvinistic" (five points) rather in its general sense of "Protestant" (five solas).
     
  5. donnA

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    We've studies the 5 solas indepth in Sunday school, and I'm in agreement with them.
     
  6. webdog

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    You forgot...

    Diet Sola
    Cherry Sola
    Diet Cherry Sola
    Caffeine free Sola
    Diet Sola with Lime
    Diet Sola with Lemon
    and the new...Solas with ginseng and vitamins!
    Sola
     
  7. saturneptune

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    posted in error
     
    #7 saturneptune, Sep 1, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2007
  8. ReformedBaptist

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    ooooook...So are you in agreement with the statements or no?
     
  9. webdog

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    Why wouldn't I be in agreement? That's what Scripture teaches.
     
    #9 webdog, Sep 1, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2007
  10. ReformedBaptist

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    Since we are agreed on these things, our differences we have had a very, very minor. Praise the Lord.
     
  11. Rippon

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    WD : Do you agree with a statement in the second proposition ? In "Grace alone" it goes on to say ... "He is absolutely Sovereign over when and to whom He dispenses His effectual saving grace ."
     
  12. TCGreek

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    Then this agreement must be qualified on the basis of what the Scripture means by sola gratia in toto.
     
  13. webdog

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    Absolutely. God has every right to grant His grace to who He sees fit. The Bible is His written Word, and It states we are saved by His grace through faith...believe and you will be saved...etc. He can dispense it to whomever, and He decided already how, and made us well aware.
     
  14. webdog

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    Probably. As I pointed out before, just that one little three letter word... :D
     
  15. swaimj

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    Reformed Baptist, a question for you: What is the authority for faith and practice for the church; is it scripture, or is it the New Testament?
     
  16. ReformedBaptist

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    Swaim,

    My friend, I would have to say that the question is invalid because it sets up a false dischotomy, or so that's how I read it. What I mean is that the New Testament (the books that make up the NT) are Scripture, as are the books of the OT. And it is ALL Scripture that is profitable for faith and practice in the Church.

    "And that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works." 2 Tim 3:15-17
     
  17. swaimj

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    RB,
    I don't think I am establishing (or attempting to establish) a false dichotomy. Baptists have historically considered themselves to be people of the NT. Our church officers are not patterned after the OT (for instance, we have no priesthood as an office) but are patterned after the NT where we find the unique offices of pastor and deacon. Our ordinances are not OT ordinances but they are the uniquely NT ordinances of Lord's supper and emersion. While all scripture is profitable, as you have quoted, much of the OT instruction about daily living and worship is simply not valid today. It has been superceded by the revelation of Jesus Christ and his fulfillment of the Old Covenant and the authoritative writings of the apostles and their associates in the New Testament.

    The Roman Catholic Church does not make this distinction between the Old and New Testament. This is why they have a priestly office and it is why, in their Eucharist, they continually sacrifice the body and blood of Christ. The reformers are fuzzy on this point, which is why some reformed churches still have priesthoods and why some view the elements in communion too literally. Baptists historically have made a clear distinction in this area and we pattern ourselves after the NT exclusively. It is the NT that is our rule of faith and practice. Not that we have achieved perfection, of course, but we do recognize the proper ideal.
     
  18. ReformedBaptist

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    Swaim,

    I didn't think you were trying to, but I couldn't answer the question as written. No matter, we are beyond that. We are both agreed that Scripture is comprised of both Old and New Testaments. I agree that Rome has set up what was meant to be abolished under the New Covenant. I also agree that the Old Covenenat has been done away with, and the New Covenant is established.

    I agree that the ceremonial and ordinances under the Old Covenant have ceased and are no longer binding today. i.e. A christian does not have to circumcise their male children.

    I disagree that the moral Law of God has in any way ceased or been abrogated to the Christian. It is still wrong for the Christian to commit murder, et. The threatenings of the Law as to its disobedience is swallowed up in the victory of Christ, being that the Law is fulfilled in us who believe.

    The Law of God has great place and significance in the life of the Christian. We can with OT saints rejoice in it, love it, and obey it. I personally love the Law of God. It is altogether good, right, perfect, equitable, fair, and lovely. In it I see displayed the wisdom, care, understanding, and love of God.

    Hey....maybe we should start a thread called The Law of God.

    I am not sure what you read about the reformers' views on the Lord's Table that made you think they were fuzzy on it. I always thought they were pretty clear. The Lutherans have seemed closer to Rome than others, but wholly denying transubstantiation. Other Reformed churches call it a sacrament and a means of grace.

    We call it an ordinance, but I am not going to get hung up on terms if we mean the same thing, that its orgin is Divine and is to be practiced in the Church. As for it being a means of grace I am not convinced by Scripture that it is anything more than a memorial, as the passover was to the Jews, which foreshowed Christ, so the Lord's Table is a memorial to Christ's death. I reject any idea that Christ is inufusing grace through the elements, which seems mystical and idolotrous to me.

    But I may not fully understand what is meant by means of grace.

    RB
     
  19. HankD

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    I believe Baptists have a larger scope of folks who feel comfortable with the "5 Solas" than "TULIP".

    Of course as Baptists we all (supposedly) promote the 7 or 8 Baptists "distinctives" as has been alluded.

    Having passed through Lutheranism from Rome and then on to the Baptist distinctives, personally, I didn't see much difference in the semantics of "consubstantiation" vs "transubstantiation" and the Lutheran view of the "sacraments" compared to Rome.

    That is not to take away from Luther, a man of faith, who courageously stood against the blatant errors of Rome at the peril of his life. It was the first step of many towards a scriptural defintion of the NT Church which had been lost in the development of the "Holy Roman Empire" and its established Pontifex Maximus, the Pope of Rome.


    HankD
     
  20. skypair

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    RB,

    I have a question on this --
    How is this "whenever," this "moment," and "from then onward" determined? To me, that would be the only question. If God alone gives faith/salvation/regeneration, there may seemingly be no coinciding "moment" of personal knowledge of salvatoin. If that is so, wouldn't it be like not being born -- or still born?

    I absolutely agree that there is such a moment. I just do not see your "solas" description of that moment as nebulous. Does it take years to get to that moment? Is there something by which that moment is personally designate recognized?

    I also agree that the "solas" DO bring us a long way toward unity if practiced as it is preached!

    skypair
     
    #20 skypair, Sep 2, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 2, 2007

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