The Jargon of Salvation

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Deacon, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. Deacon

    Deacon
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    יהוה אלהא ישׁועתי
    Psalm 88:2 BHS

    Yhwh, my God who delivers
    Psalm 88: 1 - John Goldengay (2007)

    This Psalm has been called the lowest point of the Bible, a psalm devoid of hope.

    True but for this first phrase.

    Yhwh – the personal name for our God.
    ‛elohey – the common plural masculine name for God, you're probably more familiar with its relative "elohim".
    yeshu‛ahti – it is from this noun that the name Jesus is drawn, Yeshu‛ah.

    It’s the last word in this phrase that causes difficulty for translators.

    In our first English version, John Wycliffe translated it as, “Lord God of myn helthe” (1395).

    Many popular translations render the noun as “salvation” (NASB, NRSV, ESV, HCSB, NKJV, NLT and others).

    O Lord, the God of my salvation

    Robert Alter (The Book of Psalms, 2007) writes,
    But the choice of this word goes back further than 1611.
    The Bishop’s Bible of 1568 rendered it, “O God the Lorde of my saluation”.

    The Septuagint translated the word as σωτηρίας (sōtērias) which has close connections to the word “salvation” (cf. 2 Corinthians 7:10) but has also been translated as “deliverance” (Acts 7:25).

    A strong argument can be made that the word “salvation” is evangelical jargon or bibleeze and so it should be avoided.

    In any case, a legitimate translation in English, of the Hebrew word, yeshu‛ahti in Psalm 88 can include save/salvation or deliver.

    But from a Christological viewpoint, even the word “salvation” is insufficient in pointing out the close relationship this word has to the name of our Savor, Yeshu‛ah.

    No, this Psalm isn't devoid of all hope.

    Rob
     
    #1 Deacon, Jun 2, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 2, 2008
  2. Logos1560

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    The 1560 Geneva Bible rendered it, "O Lord God of my salvation."

    The 1535 Coverdale's Bible rendered it: "O Lord God my Saviour."

    The 1540 edition of the Great Bible rendered it: "O Lord God of my salvation."
     
  3. TCGreek

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    The apostles were made ministers of the New Covenant (2 Cor 3:6).

    We need to go to the NT to understand our terms (1 Pet 1:10-12).
     
  4. Salamander

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    No we don't!

    Salvation meant nothing less or anything different in the O.T., only the literal view caused blindness to the eternal aspect of the salvation of the soul and spiritual rebirth along with the promise of the immortal glorifed body.

    Jesus was Saviour ans IS Saviour. Go ask Ed!
     
  5. Deacon

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    The word "salvation" does carry a lot of theological baggage.
    It sounds a bit stuffy to me.

    Of the modern popular versions I like the NIV's translation the best here.

    O LORD, the God who saves me,
    Psalm 88:1 NIV

    The word "saves" being close in lettering, sound and meaning to "Savior".

    While not perfect, IMHO it carries a similar word-play association that early Jewish Christians might have seen.
    ***only a guess though***

    Unfortunately the Targums (Aramaic) use a different word.

    Rob
     
    #5 Deacon, Jun 3, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 3, 2008
  6. TCGreek

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    Sal, I'm only quoting the inspired Peter. This side of the Cross he says we have a better understanding of salvation.

    Take it up with Peter (1 Peter 1:10-12).
     
  7. franklinmonroe

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    Seems like pretty normal word to me (but I have been raised in the church). From the online American Heritage Dictionary --
    n.
    1a. Preservation or deliverance from destruction, difficulty, or evil.
    1b. A source, means, or cause of such preservation or deliverance.
    Christianity.
    2a. Deliverance from the power or penalty of sin; redemption.
    2b. The agent or means that brings about such deliverance.
    [Middle English savacioun, from Old French sauvacion, from Late Latin salvatio, salvation-, from salvatus, past participle of salvare, to save.]
    The Latin Vulgate at Psalm 88:2 has --
    Domine Deus salutis meae per diem clamavi in nocte coram te
    The KJV renders the word yeshuwah as "salvation/save/saving" 67 of 78 occurrences (the others: "help/deliverance" 7 times, "health/welfare" 4 times). Thayer's basically defines the Hebrew word as 'salvation' or 'deliverance' (in welfare, prosperity, or victory).
     
  8. Salamander

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    True, when salvation is viewed from the point of a child of God of course it is better.
     
  9. Salamander

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    And to think I understood this all along from my KJB.:godisgood:
     

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