"The Masterpiece of the English Language"

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Harold Garvey, Aug 18, 2009.

  1. Harold Garvey

    Harold Garvey
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    Rather lengthy but for those who are serious when it comes to the English Bible it is very informative what one of our greatest English professors taught at Yale BEFORE liberalism took its hold.
     
  2. Harold Garvey

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    Albert Scarborough Cook:thumbsup:
     
  3. Deacon

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    Grand monuments may pale as languages mature; new monuments are erected.

    Who would deny that the King James Version is the "noblest monument of English prose".

    The elegance of the KJV and it's kin certainly makes the task of memorization easier.

    But was the New Testament written in grand English prose or in the language of the common man?

    Rob
     
  4. Mexdeaf

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    "Masterpieces" have their place in museums, to be viewed from afar, separated from the common man and the wears and tears of everyday life and insulated from the ravages of time.

    God's Word, however, is not meant to be a "masterpiece".

    It is meant to be handled, studied, understood, applied, lived, and shared.

    God's Word compares itself to tools such as a hammer or fire - things that are used and consumed by that usage. Things that change form according to the context of their usability- there are framing hammers, ball-peen hammers, dead-blow hammers- yet they are all hammers. There is fire for cooking, fire for warmth, fire for welding, fire for combustion- yet they are all fire. God's Word also compares itself to rain and snow- things that are both water, yet in varying forms that accomplish the purposes of God. Things that change form and yet remain the same.

    No, God's Word is not just a "masterpiece" set in space and time, separated from man and inflexible. It is so much more.

    © 2009 Mexdeaf
     
    #4 Mexdeaf, Aug 18, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 18, 2009
  5. Dr. Bob

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    GOD'S Word is a masterpiece.

    Man's feeble attempt at translating it is a good thing, but a shadow of the God-breathed masterpiece.

    I've seen a beautiful painting in the Hermitage Museum (Leningrad). I thought it was a Rembrandt. But the guide explained that though for many years people THOUGHT it was original, it was just a version. It looked the same to me, but to the trained eye flawed brush strokes and subtle shade differences revealed it a copy.

    So we hold up God's actual breathed words. We see good, faithful translations over the centuries into Latin, German, English, Spanish and are thankful that, as far as they are faithful to the originals, they "derive" a sense of "inspiration".

    But they pale as we take the God-breathed words and share them new with the every-evolving languages around the world.
     
  6. Mexdeaf

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    You are correct, of course. I was speaking from the perspective of translations, especially the so-called Only one.
     
  7. Harold Garvey

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    To increase learning and maintain the landmarks to direct society in the right path ought to be the goal of every Christian.

    If "grand English prose" were to become the langauge of common man wouldn't that be to the betterment of society?

    I have always believed in growing in grace and knowledge, haven't you?
     
  8. Harold Garvey

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    Just the more need to keep that which is, well, shall we all say more "grand"?

    This "masterpiece" you speak of has perished in the "actual breathed words" as you say, but we maintain we have them forever preserved in the grand English prose.
     
  9. rsr

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    Interesting that the author, in a section purportedly on the King James Bible, puts the words of Coverdale's Psalms — not the KJV — into Cromwell's mouth.
     
  10. Harold Garvey

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    are you saying the KJV didn't come from the Coverdale and anyone who makes use of it is wrong to do so?:smilewinkgrin:

    Oh, and since we see nothing to show which Bible Cromwell used nothing here on your comment is actually of interest.
     
    #10 Harold Garvey, Aug 21, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 21, 2009
  11. Harold Garvey

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    can you show us his words did not come from The Great Canterbury Psalter?:smilewinkgrin:
     
  12. Dale-c

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    Some would say it was wrong and the coverdale is inferior to the KJV.
    Nonsense if you ask me.
     
  13. Harold Garvey

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    In the instance of the passage I agree there is not really anything different other than a word or two, but the Coverdale is the KJV in primordial infantile stage.
     
  14. Rippon

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    The word primordial means existing from or at the beginning of time. The Coverdale version obviously did not come about in that period.

    Infantile means foolishly childlike. Surely you're not advancing the idea that the Coverdale version is infantile are you? Perhaps you meant to use the word "infancy" instead.

    But I do believe your posts should be classified as infantile.
     
  15. franklinmonroe

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    The bold words below don't seem to match the KJV (or Coverdale) --
    'Let God arise, and let his enemies be scattered. Like as the smoke vanisheth, so shalt thou drive them away!'

    Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered: let them also that hate him, flee before him.
    As smoke is driuen away, so driue them away: as waxe melteth before the fire, so let the wicked perish at the presence of God.
    (Psalm 68:1-2, AV 1611)

    Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered. Let also those who hate him flee before him.
    As smoke is driven away, so drive them away. As wax melts before the fire, so let the wicked perish at the presence of God.
    (Psalm 68:1-2, Coverdale 1535)
     
  16. Jerome

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    It's the Great Bible/CoverdalePsalter/PBV.
     
  17. rsr

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    Jerome is correct. Coverdale supervised production of the Great Bible and retranslated the Psalms for that project.

    The Great Bible fell into disuse, but Coverdale's updated Psalms remained the version of the Psalms used in the Book of Common Prayer and Anglican liturgy for four centuries, give or take a few decades.If you listen to Handel's Messiah, you will hear some passages from the Psalms taken from Coverdale.
     
  18. rsr

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    I'm sorry to post only uninteresting items.

    But now that you asked, Cromwell was conversant with the KJV, Geneva and Coverdale Psalms (from the prayer book); quotes from each are extant in his writings. The Souldier's Pocket Bible that Cromwell had printed for the Commonwealth Army in 1643 contains excerpts from the Geneva version.
     
  19. Harold Garvey

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    Wonderful, but AS Cook was what you people call "KJVO". he was perhaps one of the greatest English professors of all time.:tonofbricks:
     
  20. rsr

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    Who is Cook?
     

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