Theophylact prayer

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by Steven2006, Oct 8, 2008.

  1. Steven2006

    Steven2006
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    Can someone explain to me what this is? It was brought up by someone and I would like to learn what it is, in order to know how to respond if it comes up again. Thank you.
     
  2. Jim1999

    Jim1999
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    Steven, I don't know the contex of this word, but it could refer to the small box the Jews use as a reminder of their duty to obey the laws of God at their morning prayer,,It is called a phylactery..usually a leather box with Hebrew writing on it; religious observance.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  3. Steven2006

    Steven2006
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    Someone I know is going to take a class on Theophylact ( I think this is the spelling) prayer.I wanted to learn what it was so when it comes up, I would have some understanding of what it is.
     
  4. Grasshopper

    Grasshopper
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    Hope this helps give you some background:




    Deu 6:8
    and hast bound them for a sign upon thy hand, and they have been for frontlets between thine eyes

    John Gill

    Deu 6:8 And thou shalt bind them for a sign upon thine hand,.... As a man ties anything to his hand for a token, that he may remember somewhat he is desirous of; though the Jews understand this literally, of binding a scroll of parchment, with this section and others written in it, upon their left hand, as the Targum of Jonathan here interprets the hand:
    and they shall be as frontlets between thine eyes; and which the same Targum interprets of the Tephilim, or phylacteries, which the Jews wear upon their foreheads, and on their arms, and so Jarchi; of which See Gill on Mat_23:5.

    Mat 23:5 `And all their works they do to be seen by men, and they make broad their phylacteries, and enlarge the fringes of their garments,

    Albert Barnes

    Their phylacteries - The word "phylactery" comes from a word signifying to keep, preserve, or guard. The name was given because phylacteries were worn as amulets or charms, and were supposed to defend or preserve those who wore them from evil. They were small slips of parchment or vellum, on which were written certain portions of the Old Testament. The practice of using phylacteries was founded on a literal interpretation of that passage where God commands the Hebrews to have the law as a sign on their foreheads, and as frontlets between their eyes, Exo_13:16; compare Pro_3:1, Pro_3:3; Pro_6:21. One kind of phylactery was called a "frontlet," and was composed of four pieces of parchment, on the first of which was written Exo_12:2-10; on the second, Exo_13:11-21; on the third, Deu_6:4-9; and on the fourth, Deu_11:18-21. These pieces of parchment, thus inscribed, they enclosed in a piece of tough skin, making a square, on one side of which is placed the Hebrew letter shin (שׁ sh) and bound them round their foreheads with a thong or ribbon when they went to the synagogue. Some wore them evening and morning; others only at the morning prayer.
    As the token upon the hand was required, as well as the frontlets between the eyes
    Exo_13:16, the Jews made two rolls of parchment, written in square letters, with an ink made on purpose, and with much care. They were rolled up to a point, and enclosed in a sort of case of black calf-skin. They were put upon a square bit of the same leather, whence hung a thong of the same, of about a finger in breadth, and about 2 feet long. These rolls were placed at the bending of the left arm, and after one end of the thong had been made into a little knot in the form of the Hebrew letter yod (י y), it was wound about the arm in a spiral line, which ended at the top of the middle finger. The Pharisees enlarged them, or made them wider than other people, either that they might make the letters larger or write more on them, to show, as they supposed, that they had special reverence for the law.
     
  5. Steven2006

    Steven2006
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    Thanks so much that helps. I wonder what type of class teaching that type of prayer for a Christian would be about? Have you heard of how this is used now?
     
  6. Marcia

    Marcia
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    I am thinking that what you heard about Theophostic Prayer. If so, quite a few Christians have concerns about this. This is something started by a man named Ed Smith, and it is very subjective and somewhat mystical. He teaches that you get answers inwardly; this is very deceptive as there is no way to test these answers as to whether they are from God or not. There are also other issues with this. Nevertheless, many Christians have taken this and practice as Theophostic Prayer counselors and there are Christians who defend it (not surprising). I would never go to anyone doing Theophostic Prayer for prayer or counseling. For one thing, they are not trained counselors.

    A man I know went to such a counselor and he said that he got confused because what he was "hearing" within him did not seem to be from God but he was told it was.

    Here are some good links on concerns with this:
    http://www.christianworldviewnetwork.com/article.php/1696/Bob_DeWaay

    http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/51560/theophostic_prayer_ministry.html
    Excerpt from above link:
     

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