Thoughts on Heart Mountain

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by Dr. Bob, Jun 1, 2004.

  1. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    Heart Mountain, Wyoming, was a desolate horse farm. Stables turned into "home" of Japanese-Americans who were interred during WWII. Not much there today; a few chimneys and foundations is the legacy.

    Right? Wrong? 20/20 hindsight?
     
  2. rsr

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    Wrong. It was racially motivated, and there was a subplot of Anglo greed in California, where valuable Japanese property could be snapped up for a song.

    The government didn't intern German Americans, after all.

    BTW: During the entire war, 10 people were convicted of spying for Japan; none were Japanese.
     
  3. Squire Robertsson

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    One factor missed by most is the Imperial Japanese Citizenship and Nationality Laws. Imperial Japan followed the doctrine of lex sanguinus, i.e. persons born to subjects of His Imperial Majesty were also considered his subjects no matter where they were born. The United States follows lex rex. I.e. citizenship is based on where you were born. Think of the mothers who come North to give birth on the Rio Grande side so their child would be an American citizen. In other words by the Imperial Japanese laws of the day, the American born children of immigrent parents were considered subjects of His Imperial Majesty.

    That being said, there was no excuse other than raw, unreconstructed racism for the Federal internment of law abiding citizens of the United States. The action was unconstitutional from the get-go.
     
  4. Melanie

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    We had some of this in Australia during WW1 and WW2.

    A redneck great- uncle was interned after mouthing off against the government ( he was known for foot in mouth disease) as a German sympathiser. He came from a Queensland district heavily populated by German settlers. My gran-pa and many of his ilk legged it up North a mighty long way to join up but were disallowed as they were all farmers and German to boot. worried about the type of soldier they might make, were not concerned about the quality of food etc....

    WW2 saw some internment amongst Italians and no doubt some others. A guy who was one of 10 kids had his mum die suddenly and Poppa being Italian wore a black armband and consequently spent the war behind wire. The kids "orphaned" spent the war years in orphanages.....
     
  5. Jude

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    Manzanar is just south of here...a Japanese internment camp in WWII. Purely racial hatred, IMHO. How many German-Americans, how many Italian-Americans were locked up???
     
  6. Dr. Bob

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    Out here in Wyoming (about 40 miles from where I live) was a huge prison camp for GERMANS. But these were not Germans living in US or US citizens of German descent - these were German Officers from the Wehrmacht.

    Guess shipping them to where there was little hope of escape and, even if they did, they would have to travel across continent and ocean to return home, made sense.

    (And no one would live in Wyoming unless forced to with barbed wire . . )
     

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