Time reporter in Baghdad: Every Iraqi I know is praying for a McCain victory

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Ps104_33, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. Ps104_33

    Ps104_33
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    For Sunnis, al-Sadr’s continued clout is a warning and a provocation. In the district of Adhamiyah, a Sahwa [i.e. Awakening] fighter named Mahmoud (like his Mahdi Army counterpart, he gave only his first name) tells me there can be no reconciliation between the sects “as long as Muqtada is alive.” Then he makes a grim prediction: “Right now, the Americans want us to fight against al-Qaeda, and that’s fine. But we know the real fight will be in the future, with the Mahdi Army. We are getting ready for it.” Fattah, in Sadr City, is preparing for the same fight. “The Americans protect the [Sahwa] for the moment, but we know who they are; we have lists,” he says. “When the time comes, we will know what to do with them.”
    The Baghdadis caught between these extremes know that the only thing standing in the way of another sectarian conflagration is the U.S. military. This may explain why every Iraqi who offers me a view on American politics seems to be praying for a McCain victory. A 100-year American military presence, of which McCain once spoke, may seem a bit much; I suspect most Iraqis would be happy with five.

    http://www.time.com/time/printout/0,8816,1727692,00.html
     
  2. NiteShift

    NiteShift
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    "Barely acknowledging the reduction in violence, the Democratic candidates insist that U.S. troops are, as Ms. Clinton put it, "babysitting a civil war." In fact, the surge forestalled an incipient civil war, and U.S. commanders and diplomats in Iraq don't hesitate to say that if American forces withdrew now, sectarian conflict would probably explode in its full fury, causing bloodshed on a far greater scale than ever before and posing grave threats to U.S. security." - Washington Post

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    The good news is that the Government of Iraq has now met 12 out of the original 18 'benchmarks' mandated by Congress, and has made progress on five more. Prime Minister Maliki did, on his own, what Congress and the administration have been pushing him to do: attack the illegal Shia militias and attempt to disarm them. This also was one of the congressionally mandated benchmarks.
     
  3. LeBuick

    LeBuick
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    The only thing I hate is it's a civil war we started by ousting the leader.
     
  4. chuck2336

    chuck2336
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    This "civil war" had been around long before we showed up.
     
  5. LeBuick

    LeBuick
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    Then why would we want to jump in the middle? Didn't we learn from Vietnam or Korea?
     
  6. dragonfly

    dragonfly
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    No we didn't!
     
  7. JustChristian

    JustChristian
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    I thought the Washington Post was a liberal rag that never told the truth. I'm glad to see you now accept it as a major newspaper in the country. Maybe next you'll step up to the New York Times, the greatest newspaper in the world.
     

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