Tyndale in Ft. Worth now granting degrees

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by John Ellwood Taylor, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. John Ellwood Taylor

    John Ellwood Taylor
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am a Tyndale graduate from 1996 (Associate of Biblical Studies diploma) and I just received a letter from the school saying I can convert my diploma to a degree.
    I looked it up on their web page and this seems to be true:
    http://tyndale.edu/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=3&page=1

    Tyndale Theological Seminary and Biblical Institute is registered with the Louisiana Board of Regents as a degree granting institution in religious and theological education, and is exempt from licensure through R.S. 17:1808.

    Tyndale currently offers the following degrees:


    Undergraduate Degrees:

    Associate of Biblical Studies (60 hrs.)
    Bachelor of Biblical Studies (122 hrs.)
    Bachelor of Theology (122 hrs.)

    Graduate Degrees:

    Master of Biblical Studies (36 hrs.)
    Master of Biblical Studies / Apologetics (45 hrs.)
    Master of Biblical Studies / Counseling (45 hrs.)

    Seminary Degrees:
    Master of Theological Studies (60 hrs.)
    Master of Biblical Languages (64 hrs.)
    Master of Divinity (90 hrs)
    Master of Theology (121 hrs.)
    Doctor of Ministries (60 hrs.)
    Doctor of Philosophy / Prophetic Studies (60 hrs.)
    Doctor of Theology (60 hrs.)

    I really liked their program ( at least ten years ago) and learned my Greek and teaching/preaching through their program (they used MacArthur's Rediscovering Expository Preaching as the text).

    I'm a little concerned that they have taken a stance on the Lordship Salvation issue in their doctrinal statement, though they have toned it down from 'repudiates' to 'rejects'.
    I don't think I could continue to study there as long as new degrees require you to sign affirmation of their doctrinal statement and though it's not a requirement to have my diploma converted to a degree I'm not sure I want to do so. I not only feel it's wrong theologically but it is rather poorly worded; how exactly do they define 'Lordship Salvation' and why would use such language as 'XII. Lordship Salvation
    We reject what is called Lordship Salvation. This teaching seems to go against the
    clear biblical teaching that salvation is by grace through faith in the Lord Jesus
    Christ.'
    'Seems'? do they know or not what what this teaches? how can you reject something if you only 'seem' to knwo what it means?
    As well, they seem to be officially now 4 pointers: XI. The Extent of Salvation
    We hold that Christ’s atonement was unlimited as to its provision for fallen humanity
    but limited as to its application to the elect. Thus, we reject the Reformed doctrine of
    Limited Atonement.

    Any comments on Tyndale and their new degree granting status and change of doctrinal statement?
    I was slightly interesested to hear they may now grant degrees only to be disappointed that they are basically 'Chaferites' and follow Hodges/Ryrie teaching lock, stock, and barrel, and require their graduate to drink the Kool-Aid and a sign in agreement to this misunderstanding of the Lordship of Christ and what salvation is (and has always been). I knew Couch was a Dallas graduate and followed their teachers closely, but I was hoping that with new leadership they would have moved away from such a narrow and divisive stance :-(
     
  2. UZThD

    UZThD
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Messages:
    1,238
    Likes Received:
    0
    know it all?

    It seems to me that if a student to be who knows he/she must sign eventually the belief statement has reached conclusions on these tenets, which conclusions give the assurance that he/she can sign and so enrolls, and has honestly and thoroughly, systematically and exegetically, interacted with the numerous,varied, and complex arguments of those many who assert positions contrary to Tyndales, {AND WHY BASE CONCLUSIONS ON LESS???], then by virtue of such substantial study on such numerous and particular doctrines, that student really needs not any further of Tyndale's doctrinal/Biblical teaching .

    talk about cart before the horse.
     
    #2 UZThD, Dec 27, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 27, 2006
  3. John Ellwood Taylor

    John Ellwood Taylor
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    WOW! You fit all that in one sentence. I'm glad I don't have to diagram that!
    I will try to be clear and concise in my repsonse ;-)

    [/rant on] In my case I don't believe it's a cart before the horse issue. I graduated from the school over ten years ago. At that time there was no such doctrinal statement to be concerned over. Yes, I have studied in great detail the Lordship issue and have personally come to what I believe is a biblical conclusion. They don't require prior graduates to sign off on the statement in order to convert their diplomas to degrees so it's moot point for me if I were to take advantage of this.

    I initially wanted to solicit comments about Tyndale offering degrees now. Perhaps it was off topic to bring up my concerns with not only their doctrinal stances but the manner in which they state these. Don't you find it odd that a doctrinal statement contains the word 'seems' rather than 'we believe'? As well, what definition, correct or not, of Lordship salvation are they using? Those that hold the position they would militate against would agree that salvation is by by grace alone apart from works! No one that I've read that hold a Lordship view, historical (Reformers, Arthur Pink,etc.) or contemporary MacArthur, Sroul,etc.) has ever asserted that works are required to earn salvation. It concerns me that a seminary would attack a straw man as a point in a doctrinal statement.

    You are correct in that I would probably do well without Tyndale's teaching at this point in my educational/ministeral progress. There are other academically sound schools that do not have a particular theological axe to grind that could offer me a sound biblical education.[/rant off]

    Again, I remain very pleased with the foundational training I received through Tyndale (over ten years ago)- I developed my hermeneutical/exegetical and language skills through their program. With that solid base I have been able to successfully study/teach/preach with conviction and competency. As well, I remain disappointed that they have chosen to make a 'litmus test' out of two doctrinal issue that remain an 'in-house' debate in orthodox Christian circles (4/5 point Calvinsim & Lordship salvation)

    I would still like input to the original note that Tyndale, after ther legal troubles with the state of Texas, is now a degree granting institution.

    Perhaps one other thought open for feedback: What if you were to go through a program, like Tyndale's, and reach the end of program and then discover you could not, in good faith, sign assent to their doctrinal statement? In particular, a doctrinal distinctive that goes beyond normal orthodox Christian creeds. I can't imagine they would expect potential students coming in to fully understand every issue enough to agree ahead of time. If so, why would they need the education?
     
    #3 John Ellwood Taylor, Dec 27, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 27, 2006
  4. UZThD

    UZThD
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Messages:
    1,238
    Likes Received:
    0
    ===

    But friend...that was my point...:thumbs:

    They put the cart (ie, 'knowing' ) before the horse (ie, 'teaching)...they put the goal (believe all these things) before the learning.

    If the student already knows, he needs not Tyndale.
     
    #4 UZThD, Dec 27, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 27, 2006
  5. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,007
    Likes Received:
    2
    J E T Response

    First of all let me say that I do not mean anything negative at all.

    But, is Tyndale not the least bit inbred?

    And, what is this Louisiana Theological Seminary? Is it RA?

    And, did they have to leave TX and go to LA b/c of the accrediting issues?

    Clarification please and thank you!:wavey:

    sdg!

    rd
     
  6. UZThD

    UZThD
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Messages:
    1,238
    Likes Received:
    0
     
    #6 UZThD, Dec 27, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 27, 2006
  7. John Ellwood Taylor

    John Ellwood Taylor
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0
    UZ,

    Thanks for the clarification - I completely missed your original point. You wer kind in throwing is slower across the second time for me ;-)

    As well, I like your note about 'seems' for non-essential poinits. I remain concerned with their particular usage as I have already noted.

    Rhet,

    Your observation that they provide a wide offering with little depth well noted. As well, The founder, Mal couch himself, though a Dallas graduate, has his post-grad degree from LBU.

    I cannot speak to what their association are or what Louisiana Theological Seminary is.

    My experience with Tyndale ended over ten years ago. It was a different time, when there were fewer distance education opportunities available. However, I can attest that the coursework was legitimate (i.e. no substitute for hard work) with lectures to listen to, papers to write, and proctored tests to take.
    I have nothing to compare to academically but I did develop my Greek language skills, hermeneutic and exegetical skills through their program. At that time, (Dr. Couch was placing a heavy emphasis on language and exegetical teaching.)

    If I were to start over/continue today, would I consider Tyndale as an option? With the options available, including accredited distance education, it is unlikely that I would study at/with Tyndale today.

    I don't wish to enter into the accredited/non-accredited debate at this time.

    Thanks for your input on this topic.
     
  8. UZThD

    UZThD
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Messages:
    1,238
    Likes Received:
    0
     
    #8 UZThD, Dec 28, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 28, 2006

Share This Page

Loading...