What is the Verdict on LBU?

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by TCGreek, May 21, 2007.

  1. TCGreek

    TCGreek
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    I have a friend who is considering LBU? He is aware of the accreditation issues and just wants some good education. He is considering LBU. What is the verdict on LBU? Is my friend making a good choice, despite his disinterest in accreditation?
     
  2. Paul1611

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    I have heard a number of good things about LBU. I have heard that they are very professional, that they are really concerned about the students, and they offer a somewhat rigorous program of study (whether this is compared to accredited or non accredited I dont know). I believe they have about 1200 students enrolled right now. A guy I talked to about 3-4 months ago said he graduated from LBU, and was able to transfer a number of credits to Liberty University, for his Masters degree. Now how many credits Liberty accepted I have no idea. He said Jerry Falwell spoke at LBU a number of times. Something I noticed about LBU was some of the well known names on their alumni page. I had no idea that men like Harold Rawlings, Bill Gothard, and others hold degrees from LBU. Another thing that interested me about LBU was that they are 1 of 6 approved colleges of the BBFI , which has thousands of churches in its fellowship. I thought it looked like a descent school when I looked into it. I even posted something here on the BB about it, and I believe that some had a few negative things to say about it because it wasnt accredited. But I do remember somebody saying that he would choose LBU before Covington, or Andersonville. Alot of the preachers where I live are highly against accreditation, they see it as allowing the government/world to dictate what the local church should be in charge of, therefore LBU was recommended to me. Even though I dont think they are governed by one particular local church?? Anyways that is what little bit I do know about them. For someone who isnt interested in accreditation it may not be a bad choice.
     
  3. TCGreek

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    Thanks, Paul. Accreditation can be a real tricky thing, but the individual must decide. I will definitely pass this info on to my friend.

    Personally I think accreditation is a good thing, but we should know how to use it and not let it use us. For example, when I think of a school like Whitefield Theological Seminary, which has no intention of seeking accreditation, yet is seems to be a very stalwart school, I wonder about accreditation and its overall importance.

    Because accreditation has been created we must live with it.
     
  4. dcorbett

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    That's how I feel about West Coast Baptist College...From what I have read, Dr Chappell does not intend to seek accreditation because he believes, as many do, that THAT gives the government some authority to decide curriculum in the college, and he believes in separation of church and state, and he also believes that GOD "certifies" colleges that send out young people to spread the gospel, not man. If you want to be a surgeon, go to an accredited college, but if you want to save souls, go to a Bible believing, soul winning school - and I don't know of one church that makes sure the graduating college is accredited before they call a Pastor, do you?

    At least I hope and pray that is not part of their crtieria. :praying:

    Debbie Mc
     
  5. TCGreek

    TCGreek
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    For many reasons I think a person should seek an accredited degree because that has been interwoven in our educational system as a means of ensuring quality education.

    If that were not the case, anyone can set up a university from his or her basement. I am all for accreditation and I do not see it as a government control issue per se, anymore than the government offering churches tax exempt status. They are two different things, I know that, but the government is involve, nevertheless.
     
  6. southern_saint

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    Lbu

    I am enrolled at LBU. I had the same questions about accreditation so I initially went to American Christian College and you all know what happened to them. After much prayer, it came down to whether or not LBU offered a Biblically sound Christian education. I believe they do and I have been very happy with them. :thumbs:
     
  7. Paul1611

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    I have never heard of American Christian College. What happened to them?
     
  8. southern_saint

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    Lbu

    American Christian College and Seminary became accredited by TRAACS and attracted a lot of people who were looking for a Christian education on-line. It was nearly impossible to reach a professor or administrator for any reason as it was presumed that they were preoccupied with many problems they were having keeping within the guidelines of TRAACS. When it came time to be evaluated again by TRAACS, ACCS was lacking in many areas. As a matter of fact, one may go to the TRAACS website and look for actions taken in the November 2004 section ( I think that is the right date but I may be mistaken). Provisional approval was granted pending ACCS getting all their ducks in a row. They failed to accomplish that and lost their accreditation as a result. Those who were finishing their degree that year were allowed to graduate with an accredited degree but others, (myself included) lost money on tuition paid and books purchased.

    I know that accreditation is a big consideration to most people seeking an education and it should well be important that one receive quality for their money. After attending and graduating from accredited institutions and the unaccredited LBU, I would still take LBU over the accredited college from which I obtained my B.S. LBU is solid, reputable, organized and extremely responsive from my experience and I would recommend LBU to anyone. :type:
     
  9. eddie

    eddie
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    With all due respect, this makes absolutely no sense to me. :BangHead:

    How, may I ask, does God let you, me, or anyone else know that he has "certified" a college? Does God promise in Scripture to give us special revelation concerning such matters? I work as an education counselor and an associate pastor. I would never counsel any student, whether looking for a secular or religious degree program, to use such a mystical way of choosing a school.

    When it comes to professions such as medicine, law, teaching, counseling, etc., everyone agrees that a person must go to an accredited school to ensure they receive proper training. However, when it comes to preparation for THE most important job a man can have--pastoring a local assembly of believers--accreditation does not matter?! Mistakes made by a doctor in the operating room or a lawyer in a courtroom cannot keep a man from inheriting eternal life. But, false doctrines concerning Christ and Satan, heaven and hell, sin and righteousness, law and gospel, etc., can doom a man's soul!!

    Please keep in mind that I understand that regionally or nationally accredited theological training does not guarantee that sound doctrine will flow from the pulpit every Sunday. But the comments you reference from Dr. Chappell seem to indicate he believes that a school can't be accredited and a Bible believing, soul winning, "God certified" (whatever that means) school at the same time. Somebody help me here! I am missing the logic in this argument. :confused:

    Moreover, what in the world is sinful about a church wanting a pastor who has an accredited degree?! If the possession of an accredited degree does not matter to a church that’s completely fine with me. But to insinuate that churches looking for a pastor with an accredited degree are somehow less spiritual than churches that don’t consider accreditation to be a make or break issue, is, I think, way, waay, waay, WAAAY, out in left field!

    But, of course, I could be wrong...


    Eddie
     
    #9 eddie, May 24, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: May 24, 2007
  10. Mexdeaf

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    Kudos, Eddie!

    :applause: :thumbs:

     
  11. paidagogos

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    Need historical perspective

    In the past, many strongly conservative schools felt their orthodoxy threatened by accreditation. (Forty years ago, most major accredited seminaries were shot through with rationalism, liberalism and skepticism blamed on hiring academics for their credentials to achieve accreditation rather than doctrinal orthodoxy and piety.) Part of it had to do with hiring, firing and tenure. Even recently, there has been a firestorm over the non-renewal, I believe, of a female prof at SWTS.

    The concept of academic freedom in the 1960-70's made it difficult to purge even heretical or liberal teachers from seminaries. Many times, to fire a professor over doctrinal issues brought accreditation into jeopardy as in the infamous SEMEX debacle of that era. Thus, it was not without reason that some schools thought it better to avoid the accreditation game altogether rather than acquire it and then lose it.

    Of course, this problem resulted in several efforts to form recognized accreditors who were friendly to orthodoxy. TRACS, of course, was about the only successful one but it did not have much credibility in the early days.

    So, you must understand the background before you pass judgment upon these folks. Know their reasons, history and background before pontificating. One is not obligated to agree with them but one should in fairness understand and recognize their viewpoint along with their right to hold said view.
     
  12. dcorbett

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    Eddie, I have never seen a church call a Pastor based on whether or not the school he attended was accredited. I do know this: If the school is not teaching sound BIBLE principles.... and is not teaching that our job is to lead lost souls to Christ, then it is not a good school to send a potential Pastor to. I don't care if it has 40 accreditations.

    And what I meant by "God accredited" is what I just said in the previous paragraph. I never said that anything mystical happens.

    I went to an accredited Baptist college my first year of college, and I wouldn't hire a Pastor from that school !!! Not enough Bible taught.

    The Pastor we just called at our church graduated from West Coast. He is the man to lead our church. The other candidate went to some well-known school in Texas, but he just didn't "Have it" as far as our church is concerned. His stance on Grace and his stance on soul-winning were out of whack.


    Debbie Mc (My son-in-law will be attending West Coast soon)
     

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