What is this vegetable?

Discussion in 'Women's Public Fellowship Forum' started by abcgrad94, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    I've come across depression era recipes that call for a swede. What is it? Where do I find it? I believe it's a vegetable, as one recipe was for vegetable soup.
     
  2. Sopranette

    Sopranette
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    I think it's a variety of rutabega or turnip.

    love,

    Sopranette
     
  3. donnA

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  4. Sopranette

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    Yeah, they cook like potatoes, but they taste a little radish-y. They hold up well in stews, and store for a long time. But you usually have to peel the skin off, because there is a lot of dirt and wax on the surface if you buy them. But they are pretty cheap to buy, too. I really like them in stews, more so than potatoes.

    love,

    Sopranette
     
  5. donnA

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    Not sure that I've ever eaten them, not a big raddish fan, but do use them on occasion in a potato salad maybe.(few times a year, not all the time). They look and seem too much like turnips, yuck.
     
  6. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    Thanks. I've been looking at old recipes from the depression era to find some cheap meal ideas. Some of them look pretty good, others--yuck!
     
  7. donnA

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    Are those on the internet? Sounds interesting.
     
  8. Gwyneth

    Gwyneth
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    In Wales we use swede in soup (broth/cawl) It is a spherical vegetable with a purple-ish skin, the flesh is yellow/orangey in colour. We serve it mashed with butter and pepper as well.
    Swede is for humans and turnip is for cattle where I come from.:wavey:
    Also a Cornish pasty is not a Cornish pasty without swede......
     
    #8 Gwyneth, Jun 18, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 18, 2008
  9. abcgrad94

    abcgrad94
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    Yes. Just google and you should find lots. I found a great one for scalloped tomatoes that was delicious!
     
  10. donnA

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    I have found a few sites, but most are for a book to buy.
     
  11. abcgrad94

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    Interesting. By the way, what is treacle and where do I find it? I'm thinking it's a syrup maybe?

    By the way, I've been reading a blog by a woman (a Brit) who decided to eat 1940's depression era food as a weight loss method for a whole year. It's really interesting. I believe she went by the rations in England. She lost about 18 lbs in the first 2 or 3 weeks!
     
  12. Gwyneth

    Gwyneth
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    syrup?

    Treacle - I think you call it corn syrup...... not sure
    There is Golden Syrup and Black treacle ... Look up Tate and Lyle, they are the firm who produce the treacle/syrup I use. Sorry not to post link, but I`m on my way to work .

    I use Golden Syrup in toffee making, and it is lovely on toast and porrige.......very sweet. I make treacle tart using a pastry blank and filling with G/S soaked up with breadcrumbs as the filling then baked. Also put some G/S in the bottom of a pudding basin fill with sponge mixture.... cover with a muslin cloth and boil in a saucepan for a filling and delicious pudding, or tea time treat with custard.
    The Logo for Golden Syrup is a lion with the inscription something like ,`out of strength came sweetness` taken from the story of Samson in Bible .
    hope this helps.
    Gwyneth
     
    #12 Gwyneth, Jun 19, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 19, 2008
  13. Sopranette

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    Oh o, Gwyeth! You're looking to become a "Thread Titles Again" post.....and there it goes

    love,

    Sopranette
     

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