What say you about the title "Reverend"?

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by wordsworth, May 9, 2002.

  1. wordsworth

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    This title, along with Dr. and The Honorable bishop..., among some baptist ministers/pastors seems to rub me wrong. I guess I have trouble seeing humility in the title, and I wonder how this title of boast glorifies Christ. I have much more respect for the one who boasts of himself as "servant" of the Lord, as Paul did. If I'm not mistaken, the term reverend applies to one who is or should be revered. I've noticed that a few of you here embrace such titles as you have been found worthy to receive them of men, and many others here covet such titles-- and I'm not knocking you, I'm just curious to know what your thinking is behind it.
     
  2. Bro. Curtis

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    The term "Reverend" bothers me. Also, I don't like "Father". If somebody earns the title "Doctor" I see no problem with calling them "Doctor". ( I know I say "Doc" once in a while, I mean no offense. If Dr Bob asks me to stop, I will. )

    I like "Pastor".
     
  3. Molly

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    Wordsworth, Please check your private messages. [​IMG]
     
  4. TomVols

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    I see nothing wrong with it in and of itself. It's sad that ministers are not respected anymore. I prefer the title "Pastor," but I don't bristle when anyone calls me Reverend or "Rev."
     
  5. mesly

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    Psa 111:9 He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant forever: holy and reverend is his name.

    Seems like anyone using Reverend is taking away from the Lord something that is His and His only.
     
  6. Pastor Larry

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    The word in question is the word "norah," a niphal participle from the verb yrh and it means to be feared. It has the idea of awesome or terrible. It is not used of God alone in the OT. It is used of the Chaldeans (Hab1:7). In fact, it is not even a name but an adjective describing his name and thus describing his person.In fact, out of over 300 uses of the rro yrh in the OT, it is translated "reverend" or "reverence" in the AV only 3 times. Of 7 uses of this exact form, it is translated thusly only twice. Thus, this text does not indicate that someone called "Reverend" is taking away from or borrowing the name of the Lord.

    Reverend is a bit more formal than I prefer but I am called that and I don't say anything about it because it is a non-issue. I am even called "Father" from time to time by those from or in a Catholic background and I understand that for them, it is simply the title they call their pastor. I would not permit my own people to call me Father however. I prefer "Pastor" or "Larry."

    [ May 09, 2002, 03:26 PM: Message edited by: Pastor Larry ]
     
  7. Ransom

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    Michael Sly said:

    Psa 111:9 He sent redemption unto his people: he hath commanded his covenant forever: holy and reverend is his name.

    Seems like anyone using Reverend is taking away from the Lord something that is His and His only.


    Where does Psa. 111:9 say that "reverend" is his and his only? Why "reverend" and not "holy"?

    The whole dispute over whether pastors should use "reverend" or not is a real non-issue. If you don't like it, don't use it. In some jurisdictions, it's a legal title indicating the holder is an ordained minister (and therefore entitled to officiate weddings, funerals, and so forth); at least one Canadian Baptist denomination simply uses the title to distinguish between ministers it has accredited and those it has not.
     
  8. Mark-in-Tx

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    I find myself in two places. One, I don't like it when I am called by it and insist on others calling me by name. It comes from a desire for others to see me as just another follower of Christ and not someone more special or connected. But their is another place that I find myself and that is that I think it is good for people to show some respect for the position of pastor. After all the pastor is one who "re-presents" Christ to others around him. I believe that when you show respect or reverence toward your pastor you are really showing that toward the Lord. (When you have done it to the least of these you have done it unto me) So if you want to call your pastor reverend go ahead. He probably won't mind either way.
     
  9. Ray Berrian

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    If you will allow this personal . . .

    When I was first ordained an elder I liked it when my members called me Reverend. I worked for a B.S. and a B.D. and thought that I deserved this honored respect. As time went on I read Psalm 111:9 and rightly or wrongly, I felt convicted that people were calling me by the same title that should be reserved only for God. I finally preferred it when people called me pastor because I was doing my best to minister to their spiritual lives.

    There are two references to doctors in the New Testament. Jesus was found among the doctors of the former covenant in the Temple. Even these doctors of covenant truth were surprised at the understanding and the questions coming from the lips of our Lord. [Luke 2:46]

    Clearly, there were several ‘ . . . doctors of the Law' who came from small towns to Jerusalem. [Luke 5:17] While they had their education, Jesus was busy ministering healing to people on this occasion.

    While Peter was greatly used of the Lord and was the ‘first among equals,' the Apostle Paul was also used by our Lord in penning most of the New Testament truths that we cherish. Apparently, Saul/Paul had been a doctor of the Law before his salvation experience. [Philippians 3:5] There is room for everyone to witness and minister within His Kingdom.

    I received an honor conferred only after much hard work and a two hundred and thirty page dissertation. The Th.D was conferred two years ago in 2,000 A.D. I have given back this honor to the Lord in thankfulness that 2,000 years ago He died to take away my sins, and for giving me the opportunity to study.

    I think that one thing that has come out of my experience is that I have seen almost all sides of Biblical and theological views, and I have learned to accept people, as brothers and sisters, who hold beliefs that are not a part of my concept of Almighty God. As a genuine Christian it is not what you know that can hurt you, it is what ‘light' you have not experienced that can distort your view of God.

    Respectfully,

    Dr. Berrian
     
  10. rlvaughn

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    If for no other reason than to avoid confusion, God's people should just stick with New Testament names that describe New Testament offices (elder, bishop, overseer, pastor, deacon, etc.), rather than adopting the world's titles (reverend, father, doctor, etc.). And even these New Testament names do not seem to be intended as titles. We certainly live in a time in which there is a need for greater respect for pastors, but putting a title in front of their name isn't going to clear up that problem.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    Psalm 111:9
    Since that is HIS name, I do not use it. I don't mind folks calling me by ANY title - there is a respect to the "office", even if the individual in it is a jerk (like me).

    So folks called me Pastor Bob - the formal title and informal/casual first name. In 1980 when I finished my doctorate, THEY changed it automatically to Dr. Bob - again, the formal and informal.

    And I am a Bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ in Casper. And an Elder, a Shepherd, a Teacher, and a Herald. Call me any.

    FUNNY STORY - When my son got married, he sent invitations that started out with the parents etc etc. The wedding supply place where he ordered them found the correct way to list our names, since my wife is also a doctor.

    The Right Reverend Doctor Robert E. Griffin and the Doctor Mrs. Teresa I. Griffin etc etc

    I was embarrassed and most folks thought it was a little much! When my daughter was married the next year, she omitted the names of both sets of parents! :rolleyes:
     
  12. rsr

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    From Dr. Bob:
    LOL

    Our pastor uses Dr.; the pastor in the church I grew up in was known as Brother Bob.

    I think people who demand titles really need them. I have a title at work, but I only use it when pressed, and sometimes I make up one. [​IMG]

    At least they didn't call you "His Eminence."
     

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