What's wrong with this idea

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by labaptist, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. labaptist

    labaptist
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    I know a couple of seminaries that accept degrees from Andersonville for entrance into their Masters program (Liberty and Luther Rice.) A Bachelors from Andersonville would cost about $2,000. I could thus avoid student loan debt from a Bachelors and instead have only loans for a Masters to pay. I know that an Andersonville Bachelors would have limited utility outside of Baptist circles, but it seems to me to be something I should look into. After all, isn't your final degree the most important one? Tell me whats wrong with this idea?
     
  2. Havensdad

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    #1 Liberty only accepts a limited number of unaccredited degrees per semester. Out of these, only the top GPA etc. gets admitted. I actually got admitted to Liberty with my Nations University Bachelors (before I finished my SATS BTh). But I am not sure I would bank on it.

    #2 Not having an accredited Bachelors, could cause you problem in certain instances, such as in some PhD programs, some Search comittees (though this would be rare), and CERTAINLY in any teaching position.

    Just some thoughts. Personally, if I were going to do this, I would choose a cheaper and more rigorous alternative.
     
  3. Martin

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    ==I think that is a very unnecessary risk. What if you change your mind and decide to go in a different direction than Liberty U? What if you are not one of those students Liberty accepts from Andersonville? There are some fine undergraduate online programs out there. Look into different programs such as those at Luther Rice, Liberty U, or even Piedmont Baptist College, etc. I know of people who have tried what you are talking about and later on they realy regretted it. One lady was teaching at a Christian school and needed to move to the public school system because of her financial situation. Guess what? She could not. No graduate education program would accept her and she was unable to add licensure to her unaccredited, correspondance degree. She had to start over at the bachelors level if she wanted to make the move to the public school system. Not sure what she finally did, but if she had not made the poor decision years earlier she would have been better off. People who say accreditation in online education does not matter either (a) have no clue what they are talking about, (b) have an unaccredited online degree themselves and are trying to make themselves "feel better", or (c) are just being dishonest. Sure, there are unaccredited online programs out there that are of high quality (Columbia Evangelical Seminary, etc) but there are far more sub-par programs in the unaccredited online category. Andersonville is an old school and it serves a purpose for those who do not desire or need further education. However if you are planning on "moving up" the educational ladder you are well advised to go the accredited route.

    As for the final degree being most important, no, that is not true. If you try to enter a PhD, DMin, or even EdD program they will look at your entire academic record. The same is true if you are interested in going into academics or the ministry. Your whole academic career is considered.
     
    #3 Martin, Jan 7, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 7, 2012
  4. Rhetorician

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    Martin Response

    Martin,

    Thank you for your vote of confidence for CES.

    "That is all!" :flower:
     
  5. Greektim

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    FYI... It is no longer Piedmont Baptist College & Graduate School but Piedmont International University. They are expanding their graduate programs to include education degrees as well as their entire education department. Good move for them, now if they can change a few more things...
     
  6. gb93433

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    I have a cousin whose husband is in bad health and she has to work. She went to an unaccredited college and is unable to get a teaching credential. She was told that they would not accept any of her hours toward a credential. So now she works for much less than she would have if she had gone to an accredited college. It is a serious struggle for them. She makes about 2/3 of what she would have as a teacher and has to work 12 months per year.
     
  7. PilgrimPastor

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    An unaccredited degree should never be earned unless a person KNOWS it meets your needs. An unaccredited degree in Christian Counseling for example is great if you are involved in a ministry at a church where the advanced training and credential are useful, but if you plan to someday make a living counseling then you need the accredited degree from the start.
     
  8. gb93433

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    The problem is that it may meet your needs now but may not later. Wisdom says we do not know what the future may bring.
     
  9. glfredrick

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    I looked at a "diploma" program for expediency sake before starting class at an accredited school. Seemed a wise use of time and funds, but as has been said above, would drastically limit future growth.

    I ended up in a pay as you go scenario (no student loans and we never made more than $27K a year as a family) at Boyce College in Louisville (Southern's undergrad program) then moved across the valley to Southern Seminary for my Advanced M.Div., also pay as you go.

    I had the aid of a few scholarships along the way, which were timely, but most of what was paid was paid by me.

    I am SO happy I went the difficult accredited route!
     
  10. Rhetorician

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    Rhetorician Response

    Dear Brother,

    I am assuming that you are from an "SBC church." If so you have a great deal of "scholarship" money. Although you did pay a "lion's share" I am sure. You were also underwritten by the SBC churches and SBC Convention. Do you not agree?

    sdg :laugh:
    rd
     
    #10 Rhetorician, Jan 11, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2012
  11. glfredrick

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    Tis true... SBC pays half.

    My share over 12 years and two degrees was about $60K. :laugh:
     
  12. PilgrimPastor

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    It is almost always the way to go for sure.
     
  13. gb93433

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    The SBC pays 1/2 of the tuition but way more than 1/2 of the cost of ones education.
     
  14. glfredrick

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    How so? Are you counting the cost of building the schools, etc.?

    In that case, certainly, but that cost is a factor no matter where one schools. Someone always bears those costs.
     
  15. gb93433

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    Yes, schools typically receive gifts and that helps.
     
  16. glfredrick

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    I know a little bit about that. My wife worked in the Academic Administration office as the one who processed incoming gifts at Southern before she went on to be the Exectutive Secretary for the Dean of the Billy Graham School of Missions and Evangelism.

    Some gifts are applied to tuition, most go to other concerns such as facilities and endowment of a chair. Most of the gifts applied to tuition are done so as scholarships.

    People like to walk on or hang a brass plaque on what they pay for... We can only hope that is not students. :laugh:
     

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