Wisconsin Legalizes Year Round Unsupervised Deer Hunting with Cars

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by InTheLight, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. InTheLight

    InTheLight
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    Madison— A new call center operated by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is making it easier for motorists who kill deer in auto accidents to get a permit to keep the game meat.

    Motorists previously were required to contact local police and wait for an officer to arrive and issue a permit before they could take the animal. Now the call center is able to issue permits to motorists who want to keep a roadkill carcass any time of day or night.

    http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outd...-reporting-process-b99551567z1-320838361.html


    Rolf: :wavey:
     
  2. Rolfe

    Rolfe
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    Just heard something on the radio this morning about this. First time that I have heard of it. Makes sense, especially in rural areas where the wait for someone to respond may be longer.
     
  3. Walguy

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    Do you seriously think people go around intentionally trying to kill deer with their cars? Have you ever seen what a collision with a deer does to a car, in addition to being dangerous to both the physical and emotional health of the person/people inside of it? No one in their right mind ever WANTS it to happen! The least the government can do is let people who were unfortunate enough to have this happen to them keep the deer with as little hassle as possible.
     
  4. sag38

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    Exactly! Unless you have a tank, you don't want to deliberately hit a deer. :thumbs:
     
  5. Bro. James

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    The stats would seem to indicate that many folks are going about trying to kill other folks with their cars--especially while texting.

    Consolidating unnecessary bureaucratic functions is not in keeping with good bureaucratic practice. However, in as much as nearly everyone is drowning in red ink, a new spin in the administration of venison road kills is urgently required.

    Sounds like a good opportunity for a new study: Effect of air pollution on visibility of deer crossing the road during different phases of the moon.

    Huh?

    Are our bureaucracies about to self implode?

    Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

    Bro. James
     
  6. sag38

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    The state needs to place their deer crossing signs along less traveled roads so that the deer have a safer place to cross road.

    If someone is so concerned about deer being hit by automobiles then they need to focus on teaching the deer how to safely look both ways before crossing the road.
     
  7. just-want-peace

    just-want-peace
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    I have a recommendation of a couple of guys on this board that would be just dandy at that job!! :thumbs:

    It would fit their emotional needs quite nicely.:tongue3:
     
  8. Rolfe

    Rolfe
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    I doubt it. ITL likes to take his frustration of living in Minnesota out on those he envies. He gets cranky when football season gets close. :laugh:
     
  9. Don

    Don
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    I bought a crossbow because it's easier on my shoulder than a regular bow. Still, car:2; crossbow:0.

    NOW, the fact of the matter is, no one wants the meat after the deer has been hit. Seriously, all the bruising, all the polluting of the meat by damaged internal organs; yuck.
     
  10. InTheLight

    InTheLight
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    What's the point? Everyone knows deer can't read!
     
  11. carpro

    carpro
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    Liberals don't.
     
  12. wpe3bql

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    Maybe we could add a provision to the Obamacare legislation stating that each & every deer--whether or not they've legally migrated from another country--must go through a federal registration process.

    This process can't be done online because that'd cause the human Obamacare website to crash.

    Finding & catching deer in the wild isn't a very easy task. Having sufficient numbers of professionally trained deer-catchers readily available on a 24/7 status doesn't come easily, you know. :smilewinkgrin:

    If the deer is male, his antlers would also have to comply with all federally mandated antler-safety regulations including having not only an official deer photo proving he's successfully completed all his annual antler-safety courses that the Interior Dept. would have to conduct, but also having said antlers tagged with an EPA-provided environmentally-friendly permanent tag that can't come off in any buck-to-buck confrontations.

    Moreover, Mr. Deer would have to register his doe & any fawns he's sired. Upon this registration, his particular herd would also be required to complete, in triplicate, the necessary paper work--all in deer ebonics--in order for them to receive their individual animal social security cards. These cards would be made from all-climate-proof, non-biodegradable material which would be laminated & hung around each deer's neck. Naturally these cards would have to be cinched tight enough to ensure they can't be lost at night or when migration times roll around. Replacement cards will be available at certain designated Forest Ranger centers, but will come with a very hefty fee, payable only in Euro-deer currency.

    Sounds like a sure-fire plan to me! :thumbs:
     
  13. OnlyaSinner

    OnlyaSinner
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    Maybe, maybe not, depending on circumstances. Last November I hit an adult doe while driving home from Sunday evening service, ironically the day after our regular firearms deer season had ended. The deer was heading west at about 25 mph, and I was driving south at about 40 but slammed on the brakes to slow to 15 or less at impact. Even so, the plastic grill on my Ranger pickup was shattered and the bumper support badly bent - repairs cost over $1,500 though my insurance paid most. The critter ran off into the woods but I tracked it the next morning and found it about 500 feet off the road, then had a warden tag it. (Our state, with a vehicle deer kill not much over 1,000, still mandates that procedure. A place like PA, with 40,000+ such events, handles it like WI.) The meatcutters took out all the damaged stuff, and I still wound up with bone-free (and delicious) meat equivalent to about 90% of what I'd have gotten from a cleanly shot animal of the same size.

    My encounter had a few things in its favor - relatively low speed at impact, hitting the deer broadside, which spread out the impact thus limiting somewhat its effect, having the deer expire while lying in about 6" of snow left from the pre-Thanksgiving storm, the fact that nothing in the abdomen appeared compromised though the chest cavity was full of blood - probably a ruptured blood vessel there ended the deer's life within a minute or two. Other such collisions may result in little or nothing fit for consumption.
     
    #13 OnlyaSinner, Aug 7, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2015
  14. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    As a young child growing up in PA, I recall many times my father, who was a deputy game warden, would be called out to assist in processing deer kills along the many country roads in our area of PA.

    Normally he wouldn't assist on the human side of these incidents because that was primarily the job of either the local law enforcement officials and/or the state police.

    He'd often tell stories of how a deer would often completely total a car that had the misfortune of encountering a deer standing in the middle of the darkened country road.

    Deer are basically nocturnal animals that rummage along the roadsides at night looking for food that humans toss alongside these remote roads [probably right under those "Do Not Litter Our Roads!" signs!]. The damage to the vehicles was usually so extensive that it'd be beyond repair.

    Unfortunately, often the driver and the car's other occupants were often very seriously injured as well. Some of them were killed either by being ejected through the windshields--hardly any cars had seat belts back in the early 1950's--or were killed if a deer had stuck himself in the windshield and was thrashing his four legs trying to get out from being stuck inside the car.

    What made matters worse was that back then, even if a person managed to escape with only minor injuries from the deer strike, he couldn't have the deer to eat for food! Nope, back then the state confiscated the deer to process its meat and then send it on to various state prisons for the inmates to eat.

    Didn't sound fair to me: A guy gets his car totaled and he's probably injured enough to be laid up for awhile [maybe even laid out!], and what does he get for all his troubles? Nothing, not even a "Thank You" card from the prison inmates who got that fresh venison!

    I still remember when I was only about 8 or 9 YO (c. 1954-55) when my father was called out one Thanksgiving weekend to process a deer kill. Both the father buck and the mother doe were killed, but the one baby fawn was still alive. Since it was a long holiday weekend, the full-time game warden in charge knew that the nearest wild game preserve would be closed for several days. He couldn't figure out what to do with this now-orphaned little fawn.

    My father told him he could carry the little fawn in his pickup truck to our property, make a temporary cage out of several runs of chicken wire, and he'd hold the baby fawn for a few days. I still have that 60 YO photo my mother took of yours truly feeding that fawn with a baby bottle full of milk!

    That was in PA back in the 1950's. These days right here in middle TN we sometimes have deer encounters like that today. Although I live in a fairly developed residential area, often times during mating and/or migrating season I'd see deer crossing the road on which I live at 1:00 am.

    The closer you get to the Percy Priest State Park--a small wooded resort area alongside the shores of of dammed up Percy Priest River just east of us--the lake was created by damming up the river just south along I-40 E--you can see the dam from I-40 E, the more deer you'll find.

    Unfortunately, many deer have been killed alongside the interstate. With a 70 mph speed limit on the interstate, not too many people can see a deer at night, especially when the usual fog sets in--and bob-tailed semis are even harder to stop in these situations.
     
  15. revmwc

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    That's what pipe bumpers are for on 4 x 4's. Well at least in Texas
     

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