Your very own historical war movie!

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by mioque, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. mioque

    mioque
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    You receive funding comparable to Gods&Generals and complete artistic freedom. What warmovie would you make?

    Personally I'd do the Crimean war. Handsome British men with outrageous moustaches taking on dastardly Turks and creepy Russians in magnificent frozen landscapes.
    The siege of Sebastopol, a love triangle featuring Florence Nightingale, the Alma and the battle of Balaclava.
    Finally let's not forget the French General Canrobert, we need a comic relief character after all.
    At the climax of the movie, the charge of the light brigade, Canrobert get's his famous line:"C'est magnifique, mais ce nes pas la guerre" after which he redeems himself by saving the light brigade with his Chasseurs D'afrique.
     
  2. fromtheright

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    I would do one on the American Revolution and tie in the ideas behind it and the Continental Congress's role.

    It would also be fascinating to at least see one on the Glorious Revolution in England. Anyone know of a good book tying that in with the ideas leading up to the American Revolution?

    I would also like to see one on the Battle of Gallipoli. There is a beautiful, haunting song by John McDowell titled And the Band Played "Waltzing Matilda" that really evokes the horror and tragedy of that battle and I know so very little about it.
     
  3. Kayla

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    it's magtificant, but this is not the war... I'm I reading that french right???? Of course i'm reading it right I am in Advanced Ind. Studies French class...why did he say that I am not familiar with this conflict. Hunters of Africa...mioque could you enlighten me on this one, I'm interested now. Feel free to use french I am very fluent.
     
  4. Kayla

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    oh btw.... If I had the right funding I would do mine on the Spanish Civil War. Very interesting.
     
  5. mioque

    mioque
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    Kayla
    My first post is in dire need of repair. :rolleyes: :eek:

    First of all it should have read:"Handsome British men with outrageous moustaches and decadent Turks taking on creepy Russians in magnificent frozen landscapes." The Turks (the Ottoman empire in serious decline) fought on the side of the British and the French. In rearranging that sentence a couple of times, they accidently ended up on the Russian side with an alternative adjective potentially intended for the Russians.

    Afterwards I feared that my memory of that famous French phrase was faulty so I checked the internet saw it was different there and copied I suspect the wrong version. It's probably supposed to be :"C'est magnifique mais ce n'est pas la guerre.". I can read French, but with my dyslexia getting the spelling right of things that sound the same is murder.
    Anyway it means:"That's brilliant, but it's not war.".
    I probably got the general who said it wrong as well, in that case it was Bosquet instead of Canrobert.

    The Chasseurs D'Afrique are a French cavalry unit, don't know much more about them.

    I guess that's what happens when you let a woman fantasize about a war movie. I was much more interested in that historically non-existant lovetriangle with Florence Nightingale. It would have featured a dashing young British cavalry officer (a member of the Light Brigade ofcourse) and a fiery Turkish commander.
     
  6. Kayla

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    c'est magnifique mean it's magnicant! not that's brillant, the brillant part might go but not the that's c'est means it's.
     
  7. Dr. Bob

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    1095 CE to 1215 CE from Pope Urban thru the last crusade. Intrigue, children's crusade, Richard the Lionhearted, etc etc

    Probably focus on a few characters (ala Shaara) and bring historical facts and people into each of the key men . .
     
  8. rsr

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    And make the Venetians the heavies.
     
  9. mioque

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    Kayla
    "c'est magnifique mean it's magnificant!"
    "
    Always be Carefull with terms that sound the same in different languages. Magnifique can have a cynical undertone in French that applies better to brilliant (or great) in English than to magnificent.
     
  10. MargoWriter

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    Hmm. Hard to say. Probably the American Revolution--with a bent toward making the British look good.

    BTW, Dr. Bob, a girl in my script writing class in college wrote a screen play on the Children's crusade. It was raaaaaaaaaather good.
     
  11. Stratiotes

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    Skanderbeg's rebellion and unconventional war against the Ottoman Turks or else the life of Belisarius.
     
  12. rsr

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    Based on the Robert Graves novel? Go for it.
     
  13. Baptist Vine

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    I'd make two movies:

    Thermopylae
    Olaf Trygvesson

    Thermopylae was where a small force of Spartans held of a million Persians, allegedly preserving western civilization from Persian conquest.

    Olaf Trygvesson was a Viking King who underwent a conversion to Christianity, but had many battles with other vikings over kingship and worship.
     

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