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Breaking News from Alberta

Discussion in 'News & Current Events' started by Squire Robertsson, Nov 25, 2021 at 6:41 PM.

  1. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson Administrator
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  2. obadiahrobinson

    obadiahrobinson New Member

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    anti vaxxers are anti human
    Anti-vaxxers are individuals who are resistant to being vaccinated for a range of reasons. Their reasons for avoiding vaccination can either stem from fear, or derive from their general distrust in the government and their motives. For years, governments and scientific individuals have attempted to eradicate these vaccine fears through the increasing use of authoritative and scientific educational methods but, despite the accuracy and validity of these methods, these attempts have proven to be ineffective and Anti-vaxxers seem to be unaffected by these facts due to their disposition and inclination to believe in conspiracies over facts, and the solidarity that they often form in social media groups that lead to the creation of toxic echo chambers (an environment where the same information bounces around and is never met or contradicted by any alternative point of view). This essay will explore these concepts in more depth and analyze how and exactly why empirical evidence is ineffective towards anti-vaxxers, deeply delve into the psyche and ways of thinking of Anti-vaxxers, and consequently uncover the exact reasons why anti-vaxxers are so hesitant to adopt change or listen to reason.

    Anti-vaxxers are more susceptible to conspiratorial ideation (the belief that society is being shaped and influenced by sinister government organizations) and have an overall paranoid and suspicious outward view on the way that they perceive society; this affects how they perceive government figures. They view conspiracy theories as a way of alarming and educating themselves about the injustices of the world. They indulge in them often as a way to feel distant from the threats of society, and as a way to cope with their anxious and fearful emotions about the world that they live in (Douglas et al.2017); because of this, Anti-vaxxers also see the government as a sinister and secretive authoritative system working together with pharmaceutical industries (often described or coined “The Big Pharma” to control the masses (Mitra et al. 2016). Thus, attempts made by the government to use factual and authoritative methods to solve the growing issue of vaccine hesitancy have often either been unsuccessful or have backfired. Conspiracy theories are a form of intuitively satisfying and non-scientific explanation for natural phenomena that Anti-vaxxers prefer over actual foreign, suspicious, and artificial sounding empirical evidence (Browne 2018). Additionally, with the availability of scientific evidence, or with opposition from people who support vaccines, Anti-vaxxers are highly unlikely to change their stance or perspectives. This is because they have a confirmation bias which forces them to only pay attention to information that supports their beliefs (Weele 2019).

    Conspiracy theories are “self-sealing”. Any objection to the conspiracy theory can often act as proof to support the validity of the conspiracy theory; (any scientific individual trying to discredit a conspiracy theory can be immediately deemed as suspicious and inherently evil, thus supporting the conspiracy theorist’s original claims) (Mitra et al. 2016). This makes it incredibly difficult for governments, scientists, and other informed individuals to try and disprove vaccine myths.

    Conspiracy theories are also a part of set values and beliefs that create a psychological balance in the minds of Anti-vaxxers, challenging this balance disrupts the very core and integrity of their intrinsic beliefs, and this is why they often feel so strongly about defending their stance on vaccines and rejecting any ulterior viewpoint (Browne 2018).

    In addition to disregarding scientific evidence and following homeopathic non-scientific solutions to vaccines as a fact, Anti-vaxxers also heavily rely on pathos-laden or emotionally impactful personal anecdotes as their source of proof that vaccines are dangerous. These sorts of descriptive and vivid personal stories from parents can act to elicit feelings of regret, fear, and anger and can thus reinforce and further ingrain an Anti-vaxxers’ feelings of mistrust towards medicine and the government (Brewer et al. 2017).

    Anti-vaxxers often create online communities of other like-minded people as a way to shelter away from their feelings of fear and paranoia towards society. These online communities often fall into the trap of being “information bubbles”, meaning that they become “echo chambers” in which conspiracy theories can be passed around without ever being fact-checked or verified. Tanushree Mitra, Scott Counts, and James W. Pennebaker, the writers of “ Understanding Anti-Vaccination Attitudes in Social Media” describes Twitter and social media as “a channel often to disseminate medical information without verification by the expert medical community” (Mitra et al. 2016 pg 269). Apart from addressing the growing issue of misinformation on the internet another possible way of reducing the detrimental effect of these social media “echo chambers”, is to diversify the voices heard in these close-knit groups. Finding a way to limit the spread of misinformation not only on the internet but on social media can reduce the overall strength of the echo chamber and thus reduce the overall amount of vaccine-hesitant individuals (Mitra et al. 2016).

    Government initiatives are usually centered around informing Anti-vaxxers by providing scientific reassurances from medical experts. But, these actions tend to backfire. For one, because the government is an institution that’s already generally mistrusted by the Anti-vax community, and two because even with the availability of empirical evidence, showing this to an Anti-vaxxer is not enough to change their mind. We all tend to stay in our own self affirming bubble due to a confirmation bias we all have. We have this mental heuristic that makes people want to pay selective attention to information that reinforces our own beliefs and reject information that challenges the way we think. Thus, simply showing an Anti-vaxxer facts about vaccines will not resolve any of their fears and anxieties around vaccines. This is why it can be hard to have a conversation with an Anti-vaxxer. Once someone is set on a specific way of thinking, it can be hard to change their mind unless they are willing to; this also illustrates just how detrimental our emotions (specifically fear) can be. Fear can drive us to do illogical things to protect ourselves, but can also blind us from the glaring warning signs of reason. The only way for Anti-vaxxers to see reason and escape their bubble of fear and misinformation is to be reason with them emotionally. Understanding this nuance can help individuals change the way they communicate and understand Anti-vaxxers.

    Everyone has some degree of fear and hesitancy towards vaccines. With this global pandemic, there is a lot of uncertainty and a lot of confusion. Shutting people down, or mocking people who voice their concerns about vaccines can have detrimental effects. It can force them to seek consolation in private social media groups where they can openly voice their concerns, and from there as I mentioned before, they can get stuck in that self-affirming bubble of conspiracy theories, homeopathic remedies, and false news, with no alternate viewpoint to ever challenge or change them. It is more effective to have an emotive open discussion with vaccine-hesitant people (such as retelling the stories of grieving parents who regret not vaccinating their children). Doing this will hopefully allow Anti-vaxxers to see from your point of view.

    Closing the gap between this dualistic debate can help unify the disparities of both parties, and create an environment where each side is willing to listen to each other. This is important because living in a highly divisive world will prevent societal change from occurring. By learning to communicate and understand each other, humanity can advance with less global conflict and misunderstandings.
     
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  3. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Shouldn't "anti-vaxers" be referred to as "Pro-choice"?
     
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  4. percho

    percho Well-Known Member
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    And the seventh messenger did sound, and there came great voices in the heaven, saying, 'The kingdoms of the world did become those of our Lord and of His Christ, and he shall reign to the ages of the ages!' Rev 11:15 YLT

    Isn't the whole of the word of God, a contrast of the kingdoms of the world, ruled over by men, under the influence of Satan and his angels, to the rule of God?

    Rev 12:9 And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.

    Then said he unto me, Fear not, Daniel: for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understand, and to chasten thyself before thy God, thy words were heard, and I am come for thy words. But the prince of the kingdom of Persia withstood me one and twenty days: but, lo, Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me; and I remained there with the kings of Persia. Dan 10:12,13

    And the third angel followed them, saying with a loud voice, If any man worship the beast and his image, and receive his mark in his forehead, or in his hand, Rev 14:9

    Will that mark come from a man under the influence of Satan? By government dictate?

    They wanted a king like the nations around them. Give them a king but tell them what the king will do to them.
     
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  5. Wingman68

    Wingman68 Well-Known Member
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    Sorry fren, you do not pass go, you do not collect 200 bucks, you go straight to jail….Um, I mean my block list. Unify that.
     
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  6. canadyjd

    canadyjd Well-Known Member

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    Or…. They follow the science which reveals those who are covid recovered have 27 times better immunity than those vaccinated and children have near perfect immunity to this virus: they rarely get sick and don’t spread it when they do, and young healthy people survive the virus with no major complications 99.97% of the time, the only people with significant death rates are the elderly with pre-existing condition.

    No need to slander the only people willing to follow the science.

    peace to you
     
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  7. SavedByGrace

    SavedByGrace Well-Known Member
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    serious-no.gif
     
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  8. obadiahrobinson

    obadiahrobinson New Member

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    tell that to all the children who died from polio, or all the millions who died from small pox
     
  9. SavedByGrace

    SavedByGrace Well-Known Member
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    people can be anti-vaccines for a number of reasons, not simply to be ANTI. It is like those who wear a mask, and those who don't. To class them as "anti human", is stupidity!
     
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  10. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell Well-Known Member
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    good grief another one of those
     
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  11. just-want-peace

    just-want-peace Well-Known Member
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    ‘Pears as how somebody forgot to cycle the waste in the water closet!!!!!:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:
     
  12. AustinC

    AustinC Well-Known Member

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    In general I agree. There are legitimate cases where getting the vaccine is not a wise. My cousin with Rheumatoid Arthritis is such a case, but overall, what you wrote is accurate.
     
  13. canadyjd

    canadyjd Well-Known Member

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    That makes no sense. Follow the science. Get you polio shot. Get your smallpox shot. They’ve been tested effective for children and adults for decades.

    Peace to you
     
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  14. RighteousnessTemperance&

    RighteousnessTemperance& Well-Known Member

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    Besides being mostly nonsense, that post has virtually zero to do with the OP, which concerns an interim decision regarding extreme government overreach and the fundamental rights to worship and free speech.
     
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