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CNBC's House of Cards Special

Discussion in 'Political Debate & Discussion' started by LadyEagle, Feb 28, 2009.

  1. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle <b>Moderator</b> <img src =/israel.gif>

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    I saw most of it the first time it was on - it's an in-depth report about the housing and banking crisis and why and how the mess was created.

    It Airs again:
    Sunday, March 1st Midnight ET
    Sunday, March 15th 9p ET

    Here's the page about it with some video previews, etc.

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/28892719?__source=vty|houseofcards|&par=vty

    Set your TIVO, VCR, etc. It is fairly complicated and I may try to watch it again. Did anyone else see it?
     
  2. carpro

    carpro Well-Known Member
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    CNBC would not be my choice of stations to carry an unbiased report on this subject.

    So, I ask you.

    Liberal victimology or factual and even handed?
     
  3. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle <b>Moderator</b> <img src =/israel.gif>

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    Surprisingly, I thought it was fairly even handed. I was flipping thru the channels and happened to land on it, so being it was CNBC, I was prepared to be skeptical. But it turned out to be a pretty good, though complicated piece.
     
  4. KenH

    KenH Active Member

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    I agree. I watch CNBC enough to know that it is very much pro-big corporations, pro-rich people, definitely a Republican kind of channel as it does not favor the middle- and working-class folks.
     
  5. TomVols

    TomVols New Member

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    Okay children, let's get grown-up again.

    Ken, CNBC's analysts largely come from solid Keynsian presuppositions/theorists. You know better than that. I think you've been watching too much Kudlow :laugh:
     
  6. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

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    Enough of the personal comments and squabbles.

    Stay on the topic.
     
  7. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry <b>Moderator</b>
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    Let's try this and see if it works: Anyone who watches CNBC knows that it is not pro-big corporations, pro-rich people, definitely a Republican kind of channel as it does not favor the middle- and working-class folks.

    As with all news channels, CNBC has its problems, and this story may or may not be accurate. But let's at least note the true nature of CNBC.
     
  8. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

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    Isn't our view of television networks, websites, newspapers, etc always based on our own pre-conceived bias? Is it not, in actuality a matter of perception?
     
  9. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry <b>Moderator</b>
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    It can be. But as we know, perception does not often match the facts, and the more one is invested in a conclusion, the more likely they are to see their conclusion justified regardless of the facts.

    Perception is not reality.

    Some people will claim that a network is biased because they disagree with their conclusions. In some cases, that claim will be right, but not because they disagree with conclusions, but because they are actually biased.

    Studies during the last election showed a clear bias in the MSM by studying positive and negative stories about the respective candidates. So someone might say, "X network is biased because they told a bad story about McCain." But that in and of itself is not evidence of bias.

    In this case, someone can claim that CNBC is pro-big corporations and pro-rich (which I am not sure why that would be bad, even if it were true), but the facts don't really bear that out it seems to me. That is a conclusion based on one's own biases, rather than on an objective study of the facts.

    Now if someone has a story or a study to back up this theory, that would be worth looking at. But one hasn't been offered.
     
  10. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

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    Is the phrase in bold not indicative of that fact that we see any supposed 'facts' from our own bias?

    Bias is not bad - but it is a fact. What seems pro-big corporation to one may not seem that way at all to another.

    Who is right? The truth is probably somewhere in the middle.
     
  11. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry <b>Moderator</b>
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    Yes, but bias doesn't negate the facts. We have to see that there are two categories here: perception and reality. They may be the same, they may not be.

    But again, the facts are the facts. It is either pro-big corporation or not. And on a network, programs may differ. That someone perceives something as pro big business (or pro whatever) could not be less relevant to the issue. They may need to change their perception.

    Perhaps, but this is often a copout made out of political correctness.
     
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