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Family Care Plan

Discussion in 'Vets and Friends' started by Salty, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    Found this on Facebook

    Leaders I have a question that maybe you all can help me with. SM incoming to new unit. SM is a divorced single parent. No previous family care plan was in place. SM was counseled about having one and given the 30 day mark to implement one. Unit is deploying and going to NTC. SM is not on the list to deploy and the roster was set for NTC prior to the SM arriving at the unit. Upon periodic meetings with 1sg and CO. It was mentioned that CSM wants to flag and begin chapter process prior to the 30 day window expiring. It SEEMS as if this is a scare tactic to rush SM into completing sooner for numbers. My question is can that legally be done? Thanks in advance for any and all comments. Please keep them professional in nature


    Should Single parents be allowed to remain in the service?
    Other thoughts?

    Open for discussion
     
  2. David Kent

    David Kent Well-Known Member
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    Not living in the US that is all a foreign language to me and as I often have to say to cold callers from Asia, "I have no idea what you are talking about,"
     
  3. Rob_BW

    Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    Single parents, or single service members who have custody of a dependent adult (parent, sibling), and dual military couples (both members of the marriage are in the military), must have a family care plan on file. Actually, both a short term (for examlme you got delayed at work and can make it home til 2200) and a long term (you go to Afghanistan for a year) care plans need to be outlined.
     
  4. JonC

    JonC Lifelong Disciple
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    No...with room for exceptions.

    I say no because it all boils down to a FCP. I've seen soldiers stay in and enjoy the benefits of the military only to have their FCP fall through when facing deployment. The exception, IMHO, would be (maybe) a career soldier who has a good FCP, reviewed annually, and aware that he/she will be discharged if it falls through.
     
  5. Rob_BW

    Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    I know some single parents who handle their military career well, and some that don't. I suppose that's why it's important for commander's to have the authority to separate soldiers who can't make it work.

    Soldiers who need but don't have a family care plan are reported as nondeployable on the USR, so it a big deal. The 30 days can be shortened, though it rarely is.

    I'm curious if this troop transferred in from across post, or across the country. If they just got moved over from across post and were lacking a family care plan, I would probably be pushing for a separation, too.
     
  6. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    I think the NCO stated the the SM recently arrived and newly divorced
    Nothing was said about the Dad
     
  7. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson Administrator
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    David, that's only because as I understand it, soldiers in the British Army are rarely transferred between regiments. Battalions and companies, yes. Regiments, no. In the US Army, one could serve in a variety of units as one is transferred from one geographic location to another.
     
  8. Rob_BW

    Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    An acquaintance got to do an exchange assignment in Brecon. He was invited to a formal dinner with a regiment I can't recall, but the photos he showed us of the regimental mess were amazing. Definitely a different vibe then what we have in the States.
     
  9. David Kent

    David Kent Well-Known Member
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    I don't know much about army life as I failed my medical for military service. My dad was not accepted during the 1939-45 war as he was very short sighted. My grandfather was in the 1st world war, in France. He was injured and treated and returned to the front in a different regiment. He said that people never survived after transferring regiments. He was killed in France. at the end of September 1918, shortly before the end of the war.
     
  10. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
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    I think we are getting off the OP
     
  11. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson Administrator
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    Getting off the rabbit trail, yes, the CSM seems to be playing, hardball. I'd hazard he's of the sort that wants no non-deployables in his unit.

    As for "Should Single parents be allowed to remain in the service?" In the world today, yes. It's a factor we just have to live with, like married personnel E-3 and below with children.




     
  12. Rob_BW

    Rob_BW Well-Known Member
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    AR 635-200 Active Duty Enlisted Administrative Separations

    Section III Other Convenience of the Government Separation Policies
    5–8. Involuntary separation due to parenthood
    a. Soldiers will be considered for involuntary separation when parental obligations interfere with fulfillment of military responsibilities. (See AR 600–20, chapter 5, concerning Soldiers’ responsibilities for care of family members as related to military responsibilities.) Specific reasons for separation because of parenthood include—
    (1) Inability to perform prescribed duties satisfactorily.
    (2) Repeated absenteeism.
    (3) Repeated tardiness.
    (4) Inability to participate in field training exercises or perform special duties such as CQ and staff duty noncommissioned officer (NCO).
    (5) Non-availability for worldwide assignment or deployment according to the needs of the Army.
    b. Separation processing may not be initiated under this paragraph until the Soldier has been adequately counseled concerning deficiencies and has been afforded the opportunity to overcome them. (See para 1–16 and AR 600–20.)
    c. The notification procedure (see chap 2, sec I) will be used for separation under this paragraph.
    d. For characterization of service or description of separation, see paragraph 5–1. e. Commanders specified in paragraph 1–19 are authorized to order separation under this paragraph. See paragraph 1–11 for additional instructions for ARNGUS and USAR Soldiers. The criteria in chapter 1, section VII, will govern whether the Soldier will be released from AD or ADT with transfer to the IRR, or whether he/she will be discharged.
     
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