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Hanged or impaled?

Discussion in 'Bible Versions & Translations' started by rsr, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. rsr

    rsr <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
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    The TNIV and new NIV translate Esther 5:14 this way:

    (Italics added)

    The KJV (following the Bishops Bible) translates it as gallows and hanged. The ESV follows suit, as do the NET, NASB, Holman, old NIV and many others.

    However, the Geneva rendered tree, hanged and tree, as did the YLT.

    Challoner's Douai-Rheims revision renders the words as beam, hanged and gibbet. (The original Douai had gallows at the third instance.) This would appear to be a departure from the Vulgate upon which they both were based; the Vulgate uses crucem in the last instance. (The Vulgate also uses patibulo , from the Latin name for the crossbar of a cross, in Chapter 7; naturally enough, Dante portrays Haman as having been crucified.)

    Adam Clarke also believed that impaling, rather than hanging, was what what being described in Esther, though Gill doubts it.

    All that being said, did the NIV go to far in insisting that the method of execution was impaling?
     
  2. Deacon

    Deacon Well-Known Member
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    Other than in the book of Esther, the first word is translated tree or wood in all other passages, in all other versions.
    ESV note with “gallows” reads “stake”.

    Gallows reminds me of the old west hangman’s noose.
    Gallows” is just plain wrong; it brings up the wrong image in our minds.

    Rob
     
    #2 Deacon, Mar 28, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 28, 2011
  3. rsr

    rsr <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
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    I just wonder whether impaled assumes too much from the text. While the Persians did use impalement as a punishment, they also used a form of crucifixion.

    It was reported that Jews in the fourth century crucified an effigy of Haman during the feast of Purim, though it is not certain that they really believed Haman was crucified or it was a not-so-veiled slap at their Christian neighbors' celebration the the crucifixion of Christ.

     
  4. franklinmonroe

    franklinmonroe Active Member

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    I think "hanged" is probably accurate but NOT in the way we might tend to envision. Indeed, there may have been piercing of the victim's body, but again, probably not in the manner of our Western conception. I agree that "gallows" envokes entirely too elaborate an idea of construction.

    A translation of the German Gesenius' Lexicon by Tregelles states that the Hebrew word talah means "to suspend, to hang up" and furthermore "to hang any one on a stake, to crucify, a kind of punishment used among the Israelites, Deut 21:22; the Egyptians, Gen 40:19; the Persians, Est. 7:10, 5:14."
     
    #4 franklinmonroe, Mar 29, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 29, 2011
  5. robycop3

    robycop3 Active Member
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    Whatever it was, it was a forma public execution where the perp's body would be on public display, prolly both as a warning 2 not dupe his actions, and as a forma humiliation & disgrace.
     
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