1. Welcome to Baptist Board, a friendly forum to discuss the Baptist Faith in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to all the features that our community has to offer.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon and God Bless!

Japanese ww2 weapons Americans feared the most...

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by robycop3, Jan 8, 2021.

  1. robycop3

    robycop3 Well-Known Member
    Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2000
    Messages:
    12,054
    Likes Received:
    447
    Faith:
    Baptist
    Without a doubt, the Japanese feared our flamethrowers more than any other weapon we used against them. But what did our troops fear the most from them ?

    I've been told by several WW2 CINCPAC vets that they feared Japanese ARTILLERY & MORTARS more than any other weapon. The US entered into island fighting believing Japanese artillery was poor & inaccurate, having stereotyped Japanese soldiers as not being able to see that well. They quickly found out they were wrong; the Japanese artillery was highly-accurate, powerful, & able to fire repeated rounds quickly.

    They often pre-sighted their weapons, giving them interlocking fields of fire; they were often able to hit individual landing craft attacking an island they held. And their use of cover & concealment is still legendary today. Much of their island artillery was in well-protected bunkers, caves, & large pillboxes, with some pieces being able to fire & retract into shelter while being reloaded.

    Differences between artillery pieces for non-military people here: A GUN generally fires almost ina straight line. It has the longest range. A HOWITZER fires in an arc; its shells mland at around a 45 degree angle. It's used fot hitting hillsides, or hitting a hill's reverse side. It has a shorter range than a gun. A MORTAR friews its shells in a U-shaped arc so they come straight down or nearly-so. They're used against trenches or other fortifications that are vulnerable in their tops, buildings, or vehicles, or the reverse sides of hills where a howitzer can't reach.. They have the shortest range of any artillery.

    On islands such as Iwo Jima, the Japanese had huge mortars that fired a "trash-can" type shell that would hit on the coral surface, making shrapnel from the coral. greatly expanding a shell's range of damage.

    Our artillery the Japanese feared most was from ships firing inland; late in the war, many of our ships had radar & computer-assisted aiming. They were very accurate for several miles inland. (Remember, they were designed to hit a moving ship from a moving ship, so, when both the ship & target were stationary, a hit was a gimme!)
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Salty

    Salty 20,000 Posts Club
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    29,282
    Likes Received:
    1,256
    Faith:
    Baptist
    Interesting!
     
  3. robycop3

    robycop3 Well-Known Member
    Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2000
    Messages:
    12,054
    Likes Received:
    447
    Faith:
    Baptist
    A WW2 battleship could place a 16" shell in a 25-ft. circle 20 miles away. During the Vietnam war, with laser, radar, & modern computer-assisted aiming, that accuracy was increased to a 5-FOOT CIRCLE ! That's accurate enough for a 16" shell to do its job !

    Large guns don't use shell casings such as smaller firearms use; they're powered by bags of gunpowder called cartridges. the computer determines the number of cartridges to be loaded for a particular application.

    (CARE must be exercised while handling the cartridges! a powder explosion on the U. S. S. Iowa in 1989 killed 47 sailors.)
     
  4. OnlyaSinner

    OnlyaSinner Active Member
    Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2013
    Messages:
    816
    Likes Received:
    125
    Faith:
    Baptist
    Shells from the Iowa-class battleships with the 16" guns weighed about a ton. Given the 18" guns of Japan's Yamato-class battleships, those shells might've weighed 2,800 lb.
     
  5. robycop3

    robycop3 Well-Known Member
    Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2000
    Messages:
    12,054
    Likes Received:
    447
    Faith:
    Baptist
    If I remember right, the Yamato's heaviest shells (APs) were 3200lb, while Iowa's APs were 2700 lb. (Someone correct me if I'm incorrect)

    In this sub-forum, I have a theoretical battle between Iowa & Yamato. In it, the more-modern Iowa's speed, maneuverability, structural soundness, & superior rate of fire& computer/radar aiming prove too much. While Iowa couldn't sink her, she crippled her, leaving her almost dead in the water, vulnerable to subbies & aircraft, while the Iowa escapes with light damage & casualties.
     
    #5 robycop3, Jan 14, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2021
Loading...