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Most pastors use NIV, KJV Bibles, study suggests

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by computerjunkie, May 7, 2004.

  1. computerjunkie

    computerjunkie New Member

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    Interesting article. I bought a HCSB today. I'm kinda surprised so many pastors are not familiar with it yet because it seems even MORE easily readable than NIV, from what I've seen so far.

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  2. gb93433

    gb93433 Active Member
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    I heard on the radio a few hours ago that the majority of pastors in the south use the KJV and those in the midwest use the NIV.
     
  3. Phillip

    Phillip <b>Moderator</b>

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    Sadly enough, just like all businesses, its called "marketing". The International Bible Society (of the NIV) has put millions behind marketing the NIV.

    Much of the perception of a Bible is based on the marketing of that Bible. The NIV is known for having a very large translation and editorial team with many big names. Just read the introduction to the NIV.

    Holman is somewhat more limited to Baptist groups. I too like the way the Holman reads. It is very smooth and for easy reading of the chapters, it reads as easily as a novel. Whereas some of the other translations such as the NKJV, ESV and others are a little more difficult. This does NOT mean they do not make great study Bibles. But, to just sit down and pick up a book and read a chapter, the Holman is excellent, but you have to admit the NIV was probably the first to be like this.

    When you are the first, the competitors always have difficulty in surpassing you.

    Holman did a good thing by sending out free New Testaments to many pastors.

    But, Holman and all of the newer translations must climb the NIV mountain that the International Bible Society has spent years and millions of dollars to build. This is one reason the NIV is so costly when you pay for copyright fees. To see what I mean, check the prices to get different versions licensed for Bible Software; typically the NIV will outprice all of the other versions. There is a real reason for this, they not only have a lot of overhead to cover with the huge team they put together, many of which are probably making a royalty based on sales (just guessing, but probably true), but they also have huge marketing bills to pay.

    I agree with you about the Holman, but I just can't afford the whole Bible right now. I will accept donations though. [​IMG]
     
  4. Forever settled in heaven

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  5. Keith M

    Keith M New Member

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    Amazing...the HCSB copy I purchased was only $14.95, and it was the edition with the fancy cover and the words of Christ in red. ;)

    Seriously, the HCSB is online at StudyLight.org (look under Christian Standard Bible).
     
  6. ZeroTX

    ZeroTX Member
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    The HCSB is already being referred to out there as "The Baptist Bible"... Which is going to make the hurdle of getting numerous denominations to adopt it for use in church. The NIV had representation from nearly every major evangelical denomination, and has stood up to some pretty severe scrutiny and not done too bad all things considered.

    I think the HCSB is good, but I think the NIV is also good and probably a bit closer to the literal end of the scale (though both fall somewhere in the middle, not strongly on either side).

    Basically it comes down to that... they're both good, both easy to read, both good translations. The NIV has in its favor that it's been in use since the 60's, there's tens of millions of copies out there in all different forms (including a plethera of Study Bibles, Devotional bibles, etc), and the NIV has support from numerous denominations as their "main" Bible version to use for church reading.

    I don't see the HCSB taking a strong foothold at this point. I don't see the IBS as some kind of evil thing. They've done a good thing by making a great STANDARD bible outside of the KJV. The KJV has pushed many people away from Bible reading. I never read the Bible on my own until I got an NIV 15 years ago.

    -Michael
     
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