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Soul Liberty?

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by GraceSaves, May 21, 2003.

  1. GraceSaves

    GraceSaves New Member

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    Fox's Book of Martyr's has so much anti-Catholic rhetoric that it ceases to serve its function as a history of martyrs. Once an institution is demonized by the writer, he ceases to be a reliable source for a history of this sort.

    No, I don't trust it as a source one bit.

    God bless,

    Grant
     
  2. DHK

    DHK <b>Moderator</b>

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    So with one stroke of a paint brush you discount all Baptist historians and preachers as unreliable sources because they preach hard against sin--as the Bible commands them to. Some of the greatest preachers and expositors of the Bible were also very anti-Catholic. Have you ever heard of T.T. Shields, a great preacher in Toronto near the turn of the Century. Try finding something about him through a search engine. See if you can find some of his sermons. He was bound to be preaching against the Catholic Church on a regular basis--in a country that is primarily Catholic.
    DHK
     
  3. DHK

    DHK <b>Moderator</b>

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    John Fox (or Foxe) was born at Boston, in Lincolnshire, in 1517, where his parents are stated to have lived in respectable circumstances. He was deprived of his father at an early age; and notwithstanding his mother soon married again, he still remained under the parental roof. From an early display of talents and inclination to learning, his friends were induced to send him to Oxford, in order to cultivate and bring them to maturity.

    During his residence at this place, he was distinguished for the excellence and acuteness of his intellect, which was improved by the emulation of his fellow collegians, united to an indefatigable zeal and industry on his part. These qualities soon gained him the admiration of all; and as a reward for his exertions and amiable conduct, he was chosen fellow of Magdalen College; which was accounted a great honor in the university, and seldom bestowed unless in cases of great distinction. It appears that the first display of his genius was in poetry; and that he composed some Latin comedies, which are still extant. But he soon directed his thoughts to a more serious subject, the study of the sacred Scriptures: to divinity, indeed, he applied himself with more fervency than circumspection, and discovered his partiality to the Reformation, which had then commenced, before he was known to its supporters, or to those who protected them; a circumstance which proved to him the source of his first troubles.

    He is said to have often affirmed that the first matter which occasioned his search into the popish doctrine was that he saw divers things, most repugnant in their nature to one another, forced upon men at the same time; upon this foundation his resolution and intended obedience to that Church were somewhat shaken, and by degrees a dislike to the rest took place.

    His first care was to look into both the ancient and modern history of the Church; to ascertain its beginning and progress; to consider the causes of all those controversies which in the meantime had sprung up, and diligently to weigh their effects, solidity, infirmities, etc.

    Before he had attained his thirtieth year, he had studied the Greek and Latin fathers, and other learned authors, the transactions of the Councils, and decrees of the consistories, and had acquired a very competent skill in the Hebrew language. In these occupations he frequently spent a considerable part, or even the whole of the night; and in order to unbend his mind after such incessant study, he would resort to a grove near the college, a place much frequented by the students in the evening, on account of its sequestered gloominess. In these solitary walks he was often heard to ejaculate heavy sobs and sighs, and with tears to pour forth his prayers to God. These nightly retirements, in the sequel, gave rise to the first suspicion of his alienation from the Church of Rome. Being pressed for an explanation of this alteration in his conduct, he scorned to call in fiction to his excuse; he stated his opinions; and was, by the sentence of the college convicted, condemned as a heretic, and expelled.
    More of John Foxe, and his book can be read at:

    Foxe's Book of Martyrs
     
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