1. Welcome to Baptist Board, a friendly forum to discuss the Baptist Faith in a friendly surrounding.

    Your voice is missing! You will need to register to get access to all the features that our community has to offer.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon and God Bless!

The Carpenter's Chapel (5)

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by Jim1999, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sunday October 24, 2004

    Chapter 3

    “There was a man of the Pharisees, named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews:”
    (John 3:1)
    The man named Nicodemus appears only on three occasions in the New Testament, but these three reveal a most remarkable character. In a way, he has become a "type" of all those who come to Christ for salvation.
    First, we see here in John chapter three Nicodemus as an interested inquirer:

    “The same came to Jesus by night, and said unto him, Rabbi, we know that thou art a teacher come from God: for no man can do these miracles that thou doest, except God be with him.” (John 3:2)
    Similarly, those who come to Christ today must come with an open mind and heart, willing to take the time to learn of Christ and of their own need of salvation. The Lord told Nicodemus of his need of regeneration and then of God's gift of eternal life to those who would receive Christ and His sacrificial death.

    Second, despite Nicodemus saying in John 3:9: "How can these things be?" We next see him as the confessing convert:
    “ Nicodemus saith unto them, (he that came to Jesus by night, being one of them,) ‘ Doth our law judge any man, before it hear him, and know what he doeth?’” (John 7:50-51)
    This was perhaps a weak defense, he did not come right out and say, "I believe in Him and I think you are doing Him an injustice." But the result was that he was indeed defending the Lord Jesus in the midst of his own peers as they were seeking to arrest and kill Him.

    Third, we see Nicodemus as a devoted disciple:
    And there came also Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night, and brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight.
    (John 19:39)
    The scripture record is silent in regards to Nicodemus after this, but it is quite certain that there were consequences for his actions here, By doing this he openly identified with the Lord Jesus, and defiantly went against the other Jewish leaders. It is not beyond possibility that this cost him his life.
    Note the progression here:
    1. Coming to Jesus BY NIGHT. Possibly out of fear of his fellow Jews.
    2. A mild defense of Christ before his peers.
    3. Openly identifying with the Lord Jesus, even if his life was at stake.
    Now, what can we say of ourselves? Are we a 1, 2 or 3?
     
  2. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Monday October 25, 2004

    “Jesus answered and said unto him, ‘Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.’”
    (John 3:3)
    The vital doctrine of regeneration has been applicable in all ages, for man by nature is a lost sinner and must be spiritually reborn through faith in God and His promises to be saved.

    (1Pe 1:23) Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever.
    (Tit 3:5) Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost;
    (Tit 3:6) Which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour;
    Note that this rebirth is produced only through the eternal Word of God.
    (1Pe 1:3) Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,
    (1Pe 1:4) To an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you,
    To be raised from spiritual death in sin to eternal life in Christ is a true miracle, as much so as the physical resurrection of Christ Himself, or even as the very creation of the world.
    (2Co 4:6) For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.
    (2Co 5:17) Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.
    The term "born again" has come into wide use in recent years-too wide and popular, in fact, for many who use it have little comprehension of its meaning. First of all, there cannot be a real Christian who is not a "born-again Christian." Jesus here says, "unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.”
    James writes:
    (Jam 1:18) Of his own will begat he us with the word of truth, that we should be a kind of firstfruits of his creatures.
    The creator of the universe is the creator of the new birth. He brought us forth as a kind o first fruits of His creatures. The new birth is not a new leaf, or a new morality, but a new creation!
    The miracle of the new birth is accomplished through faith in Christ, believing the record of His saving work, as revealed by the Scriptures.
    Now comes one of the rulers of the Jews, religious from the crown of his head to the soles of his feet and yet he says, "How can these things be?" (vs9). It is not as if "these things" were not mentioned in the Old Testament, for example, in David's prayer he says:
    (Psa 51:10) Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me.
     
  3. Jim1999

    Jim1999 <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tuesday, October 26, 2004

    A young lad was meeting with his minister. He said, "Sometimes I think I am not a Christian. I don't seem to have the same interest that I once had. It is not easy for me to remember God."

    The minister replied, "What about your father when he is away? Do you forget him?"

    "Not a bit," said the lad. "We had letters from him which we read, and we kept talking about him and looked forward to the time when he would be home. There wasn't much chance to forget him."

    "Suppose you had no letters from your father, and you did not talk about him. Would that have made a difference?"

    "Oh yes," said the lad. "I suppose that would be all the difference."

    "Can't you see that it is the same with God? He left us His letters in the scriptures. And we must talk with Him all the time in prayer. We must share His knowledge with others. Plainly, we must talk about Him all the time and expect His return, as he promised."

    Far too often, we allow the things of this world to crowd God out of our lives, and it is easy to forget. It is hard to curse God, whilst we are praising Him. The more we keep God in our mind and heart, the less turmoil will shake our lives. As the hymn writer says, "Just a little walk with Jesus makes it right....." With all the adversity Job faced, he never forgot God.

    Lord, help us to make every waking moment a time in Your presence. Ever mindful of the world about us, but also alert to the fact that You dwell in us.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  4. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wednesday October 27, 2004

    Nicodemus saith unto him, “How can a man be born when he is old? can he enter the second time into his mother's womb, and be born?” Jesus answered, “Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.”
    (John 3:4-5)

    Jesus cuts through the salutations and declares Nicodemus' need: to be born again. Nicodemus may well have seen Jesus as the Ruler of Israel, but he had a greater need than a new leader, Nicodemus needed a miracle birth! He was trusting in his Jewish heritage from Abraham and his own righteous works, but Jesus shocks him by speaking of a spiritual relationship. At first Nicodemus tries to comprehend born again in a natural way, though realizing it to be absurd.
    Jesus then gives the perplexed professor another example of the new
    Birth in 3:5. Jesus makes the distinction of natural birth (water) and
    Spiritual birth (Spirit). The Liberty Bible Commentary states:
    "To be part of God's kingdom, one must be 'born of water and of he Spirit.' There are three interpretations as to the meaning of water: it refers to the washing of the water of God's Word (1Peter 1:23); it refers to baptism; or it refers to physical birth. The latter (last) of the three seems to be the most logical." (p. 215) The Bible Knowledge Commentary reminds us that referring it to baptism results in making baptism "an essential part of regeneration. (This view contradicts other Bible verses that make it clear that salvation is by faith alone; e.g. John 3:16, 36; Ephesians. 2:8-9; Titus 3:5.)" (p.281.)
    Water is a picture of cleansing, not of our salvation. In the Tabernacle, the brazen altar was the first object inside the door. It was the place of sacrifice, where the blood was shed to cover the sins while the brazen laver was a place to wash for those who had already been to the altar of sacrifice. The water of separation was sprinkled on people and things as a ceremonial cleansing, but not for salvation. (Compare Numbers 19 the ashes of the red heifer.) Along this same thought, Titus 3:5 speaks of the "washing of regeneration" which seems to point to baptism. But what is the context? It is salvation. And what is the means used to wash us? Is it the waters of baptism? No, it is the blood that washes us. (1John 1:9; Hebrews 9:14, 19-22.) Take note of Hebrews 10: 19-23: We have access by "the blood of Jesus" and then we have our bodies washed with pure water (cleansing.)
    The other possibility of the "water" in 3:5 representing the Word of God is similar in that the proof text of Ephesians. 5:26 has a context of the cleansing of the believer, not the salvation of the believer. Therefore, I think that the best answer is that "water" in 3:5 speaks of the natural birth and the context is that Jesus is speaking to a lost man who had no spiritual insight to comprehend spiritual truth!
     
  5. Jim1999

    Jim1999 <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    A soldier was trapped in a foxhole under heavy gunfire. He was young and he was scared. A normal condition given the circumstances. This soldier was confessedly unsaved, but as the old saying goes, "There are no atheists in foxholes."

    In his despair, he removed a small New Testament from his pocket. It had been given to him by his mother and he was instructed to read John 3:16 when he found himself afraid. The light was obviously dim and reading was difficult. He found John 3:16 and began to read: "For God so loved the world that he gave His only forgotten Son....."

    This man in the dark can be forgiven for the misreading, but how many, in full light, read the same thing? Have we forgotten the Son? I don't mean the fact of scripture. I mean the reality of scripture. We read the book over and over and often we read into it what we want to read. We end up with false hopes and constant fear and trepidation, when we ought to know the Prince of Peace is ever at hand.

    What precipitated my devotions this morning, was I received an email from London that an aunt's son-in-law was killed in a motorbike accident last Friday. There was no time to read God's word. There was no time to misread the word. There was no time!

    This is the hour of our redemption. Have we forgotten the Son?

    Lord, help me to always be aware of who You are.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  6. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Friday October 29, 2004

    “That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again.” (John 3:6-7)
    The term "born again" has come into such common use in recent years, even in political campaigns, that its tremendous meaning has been all but lost. But Jesus-who ought to know, being none other than God incarnate-said "You must be born again." Furthermore, He said this to Nicodemus, one of the most religiously knowledgeable people of that day.
    He did not say to Nicodemus that "they must be born again," meaning the unbelieving multitudes who were not as instructed in the things of God as they should be. Nor did He say "we must be born again," meaning all of us mortals, including Himself. Rather, Jesus said, "You must be born again."
    Even a man like Nicodemus must be born spiritually-born again (literally, "born from above")-if he were ever to see the kingdom of God (John 3:3). In answer to his question as to how this could be, Jesus said he must be born of the Spirit, supernaturally.
    But Nicodemus-as well as each of us-was born a sinner and was still a sinner, even failing to recognize Christ as Son of man and Son of God. How could he be born again? The answer is in the second imperative: "And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life." (John 3:14-15) If "you must be born again," then "even so must the Son of Man be lifted up." Christ must die for our sins before it can ever be possible that a lost sinner can be born again.

    Since Jesus Christ was lifted up on the cross to die for us, our burden of sin has also been lifted up and placed on Him. If we enter God's kingdom, we must be born again through faith in Him. There is no other way.

    “The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.” (John 3:8)
    In 3:8 Jesus uses another earthly illustration to describe salvation. It is the example f the wind. It is invisible, yet you can see the effects of the wind upon leaves, you can feel it upon your skin. However, none of us has the power to know where the wind will blow, it is going. It is interesting that the Greek word pneuma for "wind" is the same as for "spirit."
    Dr. John R. Rice declares that wind is a symbol of the Holy Spirit. "On the day of Pentecost, 'suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled the house where they were sitting' Acts 2:2. That symbolized the pouring out of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples, the 'enduement of power from on high.' Wind is unseen but real. So the new birth is miraculous and a literal miracle, but it cannot be explained logically. There is no visible manifestation of the new birth. One does not automatically weep or shout or tremble or fall when saved. So the new birth is, like the wind, unseen though powerful, literal, real.” (p. 70)
     
  7. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Saturday October 30, 2004

    “Nicodemus answered and said unto him, ‘How can these things be?’
    Jesus answered and said unto him, ‘Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things? Verily, verily, I say unto thee, We speak that we do know, and testify that we have seen; and ye receive not our witness. If I have told you earthly things, and ye believe not, how shall ye believe, if I tell you of heavenly things? And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the Son of man which is in heaven. And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life.’” (John 3:9-15)
    Nicodemus is humbled and professes his ignorance. However Jesus does no console old Nick and tell him "It's all right." No, Jesus is pleased that Nicodemus has finally begun to realize his spiritual depravity. The Lord continues to push the beleaguered professor in 3:10: "Art thou a master of Israel, and knowest not these things?" You see, Nicodemus had studied in detail the rules (commandments) of the Old Testament, yet had evidently missed the main purpose of God's plan for Israel. Surely he had read King David's testimony in Psalm 40:
    "He brought me up also out of an horrible pit, out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock, and established my goings." (v. 2)
    Sacrifice and offering thou didst not desire; mine ears hast thou opened; burnt offering and sin offering hast thou not required. Then said I, Lo, I come: in the volume of the book it is written of me, I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my heart. (vs. 6-8)
    How about the preaching of Jeremiah 4:4 "Circumcise yourselves to the Lord, and take away the foreskins of your heart, ye men of Judah and inhabitants of Jerusalem." Isaiah declared in 6:10: "Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed."
    Or Ezekiel 11:19: "And I will give them one heart, and I will put a new spirit within you, and I will take the stony heart out of their flesh, and I will give them a heart of flesh." 18:20: "The soul that sinneth, it shall die." 18:31: "Cast away from you all your transgressions, whereby ye have transgressed, and make you a new heart and a new spirit: for why will ye die, O house of Israel?"
    Nicodemus' problem was a spiritual one, he needed to admit that he too was a sinner and accept God's mercy for salvation.
    Now in 3:11 we have the third "verily, verily," as Jesus pins him to the mat as the Lord declares His witness and Nicodemus' condemnation. Notice the plural "we" is used specifying that His testimony is that of the Trinity, The Father, Son and Holy Ghost. If Nicodemus is perplexed by "earthly things," then he needs to realize that he is on the outside when dealing with "heavenly things." Notice that Jesus has shared "earthly things" which are the examples of the new birth (water, wind), while the "heavenly things" must refer to things yet unrevealed.
    The JFB Commentary states:
    "How paradoxical this sounds: No one has gone up but He that came down, even He who is at once both up and down. Doubtless it was intended to startle and constrain his auditor to think that there must be mysterious elements in His person." (p. 363)
    3:13 clearly speaks of His Deity as the Word made flesh was at that time both present with Nicodemus as well as present in heaven. He goes on to tell another heavenly truth to the dizzy professor.
    In 3: 14-17 Nicodemus sign - The Son of man lifted up = the cross. (Realize there will be no response from Nicodemus. Later we see Nick defending Jesus in 7:50, yet there is no clear reference to his conversion until we see the shadow of the cross: John 19:39.
    One possibility is that Nicodemus knew Jesus was sent by God, but it may have been the cross and Jesus' words that He must be lifted up that caused Nicodemus to see the Savior. The serpent in the wilderness refers back to Numbers 21: 5-9 when Moses had a brazen serpent placed upon a pole and looking unto the serpent brought life to those who were dying from their sin. Now to this example, Jesus applies the key ingredient: "even so must the Son of man be lifted up." The cross was not an option, as God knew mans sinfulness.
    But as the brazen serpent raised in the wilderness brought life to all dying, sinful men, even more those who will believe in the Son of man, Who was raised upon an old rugged tree, will have "eternal life." Isa. 45:22: "Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth: for I am God, and there is none else."
    The Lord introduces a new concept that goes all the way back to the garden of Eden. After Adam and Eve sinned, the Godhead spoke aloud of the problem of man gaining everlasting life (Genesis 3: 22-24). Most of the references to eternal life or everlasting life was used in reference to God or the nation of Israel (In reference to the Messiah: Psalm 22:26; to national rebirth of Israel: Ezek. 37 the vision of dry bones that live again). Probably Dan. 12:1-2 is the clearest promise of everlasting life for the individual. Dan. 12:2: "And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt." Compare Martha's testimony in John 11:24. Also see Job 14:14; 19:25-26; And David's hope to see his dead son again: 2Sam. 12:23. Yet now Jesus, as he begins His public ministry, will speak continually of eternal life for the believer.
    So in John 3:15, the Master switches from the "sign" to the promise: "eternal life." Jesus now presents to Nicodemus and to the whole world, the one requirement for salvation is belief (placing our trust) in God's Son.
    In John 3:16 we have "the gospel in a nutshell." It looks at the plan of salvation from God's point of view.
    First, we are told that "God so loved the world." a world full of sin and sorrow.
    Second, we are told that God saw the need of this wicked world, so He gave the greatest gift - His Son! Romans 8:32: "He that spared not His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all..."
    Third, by placing our trust in Him, the believer can have three promises:
    1. "Shall not perish"
    2. "Have everlasting life"
    3. Be "not condemned"
    We also see the international scope of the gospel. God offers salvation to the whole world, not just a chosen few. He died for all sinners, not just for the ones He knew would accept Him and, certainly not just for a certain group that He would force to be saved by, "irresistible grace." All can come to Christ, anyone can be saved. (Isa. 55:1; Mt. 11:28; Rev. 3:10)
     
  8. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sunday October 31, 2004

    “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.” (John 3:16,17)
    What have we heard John 3:16 called?
    The one-verse Bible, or the Bible in one verse? If this were all that a person knew of God's Word, one might believe in universalism, that is, that everyone will be saved, without exception; it makes no difference how the person lives, or even, what they believe. But we know from the rest of God's Word that such is not the case.
    So, while this passage does not tell us everything that we need to know, it does speak volumes as far as the love God Has for us. God has demonstrated such a great love for us that no one should ever have the wicked thought that God doesn't love , or care for them. Paul writes: "For when we were still without strength,, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die; yet perhaps for a good man someone would even dare to die. But God demonstrates His love toward us in that, while we were still sinners, Christ died for us." (Romans 5: 6-8)
    The gift of salvation was, clearly, God's greatest gift; God gave Himself for a lost and undeserving world. It was the greatest gift because it met the greatest need, revealed the greatest love, and the greatest scope and purpose of any gift that could ever be conceived in the heart of the omniscient Creator.
    This was not the end of His giving, of course. "He that spared not His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things? (Romans 8:32)
    The great gift of God is abundantly sufficient to provide salvation and everlasting life for the whole world. But a gift only becomes a gift when it is accepted, and the greatest of all gifts has been spurned and ridiculed, or-worst of all-simply ignored by multitudes who need it so much. When they blazingly refuse God's free gift of everlasting life, they can only perish in everlasting death. God did all He could do when He gave His Son; for when He gave His Son, He gave Himself.
    "He gave His only begotten Son," can better be appreciated by considering Genesis 22:2:
    And he said, Take now thy son, thine only son Isaac, whom thou lovest, and get thee into the land of Moriah; and offer him there for a burnt offering upon one of the mountains which I will tell thee of.
    Note the emphasis on Abraham's love for his only son. The place of sacrifice, Moriah, approximates Calvary's location. Isaac was to carry wood, Jesus, a cross. Isaac plaintively inquired of his father, "Behold the fire and the wood; but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?" To this Abraham replied, "My son, God will provide Himself a lamb for a burnt offering." (v.8)
    God was pleased with Abraham's faith. He promised Abraham that "in your seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed" (v.18). The very first verse of the New Testament identifies Jesus as "the Son of Abraham"-Abraham's seed. We know that God the Father spared Isaac (Genesis 22:12) but not His own Son.
    Now we are told in 3:17 the purpose of the Son coming from heaven, not to rule the world, not to condemn the world, but to save the world. Yes, Jesus will come some day to rule as King of Kings, and He will judge, but His first and primary purpose was to come as Saviour, (1John 4:14). Nicodemus was looking for a leader for the Jews, but Jesus came to save the world. Nicodemus wanted someone to conquer the Romans, but Jesus came to conquer sin, death and the Devil.
     
  9. Jim1999

    Jim1999 <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Monday, November 1, 2004

    Dr. Russell Conwell preached in a small church. It was so small that it could not care for the growing congregation. On Sunday morning, as Dr. Conwell approached the church, he met a little girl who was crying. He asked her why she was crying. She replied that there was no room for her in the Sunday School so she was going home. Dr. Conwell put his arms around the little girl and said, "I will find a place for you."

    Some time later, the little girl was taken suddenly ill and died. Under her pillow was found an old pocketbook. In it were fifty-seven pennies, and a scrap of paper on which was written: "To help build the little Temple bigger, so that more children can go there to Sunday School."

    Dr. Conwell told the touching story of little Hattie to his people. Their hearts were touched. They all began to give money for the enlargement of the little church. The newspapers told the story far and wide and within five years those fifty-seven pennies had grown to $250,000.00.

    To-day, on North Broadway Street in Philadelphia, you can see the great Temple Baptist Church, which seats 3,300 people. All the children who want to attend may go to Sunday School and be comfortable there. Little Hattie was only a little girl, but she gave what she could, and God increased her offering. How true is the saying, "When God is in it, little is much."

    This is a true story about the Temple Baptist Church of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    How little do we give with so much importance. To-day, poverty is often self-imposed by selfish wants and demands, but there is still that one who gives of themself and their penny is blessed of God.

    Lord, help us each one to give of ourselves, even when we have not the penny to give.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  10. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Messages:
    26,806
    Likes Received:
    79
    Tuesday, 2 November, 2004

    This is election day in the US. People all over the world are watching with interest. Most major European newspaper headlines focused on the election. It has been that main news story on television for days. The whole world sees the importance of the decision America will make today. It is important that we pause for a moment and meditate on the real source of power. It is not found in Brussels, #10 Downing Street, or even in the White House.

    We read in Daniel that “The Most High ruleth in the kingdom of men and giveth it to whomsoever He will.” In Proverbs we are reminded, “The king's heart is in the hand of the LORD, as the rivers of water: he turneth it whithersoever he will.”

    Sometime tonight, tomorrow, or in the days to come the election will be decided. Feelings, even among Christians have been strained. I have heard comments like, “I fear for our children if ______________ wins this election,” or “If ____________________ wins America is doomed.” Some fear that God’s work will be hindered if the “wrong man” is chosen. Sadly, I fear, sometimes this attitude reflects the wrong kind of thought. We are no better than the world when the result of an election shakes our confidence.

    While we do well to be informed citizens and to do our job of partaking in elections by voting, let us not forget Who is in control. God knows what is best, and He will accomplish His perfect will in today’s election. Our brethren throughout history and followed the Lord under every situation imaginable. Benevolent monarchs, dictators, emperors, and elected leaders have held office and yet God’s church remains. Governments rise and fall. Administrations change, yet the Lord endures faithful.

    Yes, the election is important. Everyone should vote responsibly. However, may we not forget, no matter what happens today, that “the Lord is in His holy temple.” As Americans go to the polls today we are well advised to remember the words of the psalmist, “It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in princes.
    (Psalm 118v9)
     
  11. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Roger. I confess that I have fretted some about this election; thinking that if ________ wins it will bode very ill for this country. Also, I thought that if ___________ wins, it is because the U.S.A. has been given over (Romans 1:24); and is indicative that God's protection will be gone from this country.
    But your post brings home the fact that our trust should never be in the arm of the flesh, but in God. He loved us and gave His Son for us; and He will work all things out according to His good pleasure. Thanks for the reminder.
     
  12. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Messages:
    26,806
    Likes Received:
    79
    Thursday, 4th November, 2004

    2 Corinthians 1v12

    For our rejoicing is this, the testimony of our conscience, that in simplicity and godly sincerity, not with fleshly wisdom, but by the grace of God, we have had our conversation in the world, and more abundantly to you-ward.

    Let us look today where Paul found his joy in relation to the believers at Corinth. It is unfortunate that at times in our debate and “discussions” among ourselves that we turn to human reasoning and techniques to make our point or to win the argument. It is even sadder when we deal with the world in the same manner. Our “conversation” here is not just that of words, but of attitudes and action as well.

    We can draw a couple of marvelous lessons from Paul’s words here. First of all we notice the negative aspect. I did not come to you with “fleshly wisdom” he says. James talks about this wisdom as not being from above, but worldly, carnal, and fleshly. In our dealings with each other, and especially with each other, we must be sure that our tools and methods are not those of the world, based on satisfying and gratifying our flesh with some sort of “victory.”

    On the other hand Paul points out what should characterize our dealings with others.

    Simplicity
    Godly sincerity
    The grace of God

    How often do these things describe how we deal with others? Paul was able to “boast” in the fact that his dealings were proper. Are we always simple, sincere, and gracious in our dealings?

    Lord, in our dealings with people today, remind us not to use fleshly wisdom, but to be simple, sincere, and gracious.
     
  13. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Amen, Thanks Roger.
     
  14. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Saturday November 6, 2004

    (John 3:18) He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.

    Jesus did not come to condemn the world. If that was the case then He would have stayed in Heaven. But in reality, we are already condemned according to 3:18 and it occurred when we were born in sin (Psalm 51:5). It is only when we believe in Christ that we can be "not condemned." Romans 8:1: "there is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the spirit. 2: For the law of the Spirit of life hath made me free from the law of sin and death. 3: For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh." Even though we are guilty sinners deserving the punishment of hell, we are not able to be condemned as the penalty has already been paid by the precious blood of our Saviour, Jesus Christ. John 5:24: "Verily, verily, I say unto you, he that heareth My word and believeth on Him that sent Me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life." Also Gal. 3:13: "Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: as it is written, cursed is everyone that hangeth on a tree."
    (John 3:19) And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.
    (John 3:20) For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds should be reproved.
    (John 3:21) But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God.
    Now our Lord Jesus goes on to describe the condemnation in 3:19 as light-hating darkness. Dr. Henry Morris observes that the Greek word, krisis, is used of "judgement concluding in condemnation." He states, "The use of the definite article - 'the condemnation' - emphasizes that judgement is not because of sin but because of rejection of God's provision of salvation from sin through the light of Jesus Christ." (p.1138) We can see the opposition to the light of the gospel as it exposes their evil deeds and they choose to hate the light rather than give up their evil ways.
     
  15. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sunday November 7, 2004

    “After these things came Jesus and his disciples into the land of Judaea; and there he tarried with them, and baptized. And John also was baptizing in Aenon near to Salim, because there was much water there: and they came, and were baptized. For John was not yet cast into prison. Then there arose a question between some of John's disciples and the Jews about purifying. And they came unto John, and said unto him, ‘Rabbi, he that was with thee beyond Jordan, to whom thou barest witness, behold, the same baptizeth, and all men come to him.’ John answered and said, ‘A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven. Ye yourselves bear me witness, that I said, I am not the Christ, but that I am sent before him. He that hath the bride is the bridegroom: but the friend of the bridegroom, which standeth and heareth him, rejoiceth greatly because of the bridegroom's voice: this my joy therefore is fulfilled. He must increase, but I must decrease. He that cometh from above is above all: he that is of the earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth: he that cometh from heaven is above all.
    And what he hath seen and heard, that he testifieth; and no man receiveth his testimony. He that hath received his testimony hath set to his seal that God is true. For he whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God: for God giveth not the Spirit by measure unto him. The Father loveth the Son, and hath given all things into his hand. He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him.’”
    (John 3:22-36)

    We are told that Jesus left Jerusalem and went into the countryside of Judaea where His disciples began to baptize those who had believed. John was also still baptizing, as he had not yet been cast into prison by King Herod. Now some Jews had tried to relate or compare John's baptism to their laws of purifying. Many of these laws were added by the Pharisees and religious leaders. Old Testament acts of purifying were for cleansing, not for identification or obedience. Their discussion had led to the amount of people being baptized by Christ's disciples. They came to John asking for support, yet he gives one of the greatest testimonies of the work of Christ..
    First, John clearly identifies himself as not the Christ, but as one coming to prepare the way of the Lord. He reminds them that they had heard this from his own lips and now states that nothing has changed. Now he gives a comparison to a wedding. He is not the Bridegroom or the bride, which are yoked together, but John, as a friend of the Groom, rejoices to see the success of Christ's ministry. Then John reveals the essence of submission in 3:30: "He must increase, but I must decrease." John is not going to compete with Christ, John will soon accomplish his goal of pointing ones to the Lamb of God.
    Second, John turns the spotlight to Jesus and gives witness to Jesus as being from heaven and therefore is "above all," which he says twice. This is a clear witness to the Deity of Christ. In verse 32 he notes that "no man receiveth His testimony" (John 1:11). But those who do accept the testimony of Jesus know that He is true and that Jesus speaks "the words of God." Then John declares that the Lord is not constrained "by measure." Moses spake the words of God as God directed him, yet so did wicked Balaam, but Jesus is not just a mouthpiece that is limited to waiting for a vision or a word. This tells us of the constant fellowship between Father and Son. Furthermore, John states that He is "the Son" of God and loved by the Father. John finishes his witness of Christ with the statement that Jesus has been given "all things." The King would have one who sat on the left hand who would deliver judgement. David had Benaiah (2Sam. 8:18) who was over his elite guards. But the one who sat on the right hand, sat in the seat of authority. Gen 48:13-18; Psa. 20:6, 110:1; Mk. 14:62; Acts 7:55.
    Third, John the Baptist's final word returns to the message of the Gospel. He states three truths in verse 36:
    1. Everlasting life comes by belief (trust) in the Son.
    2. Those in unbelief (distrust) shall not see life.
    3. The wrath of God "abideth" (is already ahold of the unbeliever)
     
  16. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Messages:
    26,806
    Likes Received:
    79
    Monday, 8th Novemeber, 2004

    Just some scriptures this morning on theme of Biblical peace. Enjoy.

    I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the LORD; and I will heal him. But the wicked are like the troubled sea, when it cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt. There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked. For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace. He shall judge thy people with righteousness, and thy poor with judgment. The mountains shall bring peace to the people, and the little hills, by righteousness. He shall judge the poor of the people, he shall save the children of the needy, and shall break in pieces the oppressor. They shall fear thee as long as the sun and moon endure, throughout all generations. He shall come down like rain upon the mown grass: as showers that water the earth. In his days shall the righteous flourish; and abundance of peace so long as the moon endureth. Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.
    Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world. Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus. Follow peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord:
     
  17. Watchman

    Watchman New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    2,706
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Roger. Going hand-in-hand with peace is righteousness; and since we have none of our own, we can only get righteousness from the Lord Jesus Christ.
    I see a bumper sticker now and then that reads:
    No Jesus, No Peace
    Know Jesus, Know Peace
    That is right on!
     
  18. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2003
    Messages:
    26,806
    Likes Received:
    79
    Wednesday, 10th November, 2004

    2nd Corinthians 1v14
    As also ye have acknowledged us in part that we are your rejoicingeven as ye also are ours in the day of Jesus Christ

    The more we read of the word of God the more we see how far short we often fall in our relationship to each other. The things described here will not be fully seen until the “day of Christ Jesus” Yet, there are things that we are able to see “in part” as Paul says here.

    What is that goal? The KJV uses the phrase “that we are your rejoicing and you are our rejoicing” which is not a bad picture of what we should be for each other. The phrase literally means that the believers in Corinth gave Paul and his companions a reason to be proud of them and that the Paul and his companions gave the Corinthians reasons to be proud of them.

    What does all of this mean for us today? Simple enough, I think. Do we, by our lives and attitudes give other believers a reason to be proud of us, do we give them cause for rejoicing? For a moment, lets us forget about how others, and look at ourselves. Are we indeed a cause for rejoicing for other believers? Or, are we an embarrassment to other Christians. We often say things like “I don’t really care what others think.” Is that a Biblical stand? Should we not give others a reason to rejoice?
     
  19. following-Him

    following-Him Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    10,971
    Likes Received:
    9
    Thank you Roger.

    Our actions really can and often do speak louder than words.

    God Bless

    Sheila
     
  20. Jim1999

    Jim1999 <img src =/Jim1999.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    15,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    Looks like I was supposed to do the devotional to-day. I just got my computer back ten minutes ago.

    It is remembrance day and we are ask to remember those who paid the supreme price for freedom over three wars, not to mention those who have paid the supreme price for service to the King. The missionaries who have died whilst preaching the gospel; the preachers who have been stoned along the way; and those who risk their lives daily to deliver THE message; and, not forgetting that our Lord Jesus hung from the tree for you and for me.

    Thank you, Jesus.

    Jim
     
Loading...