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Baptists Are Protestants

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by Rippon, Feb 16, 2018.

  1. Rippon

    Rippon Well-Known Member
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    I have mentioned these things a number of times in the past. But on the BB we tend to repeat ourselves, don't we?

    "We [Baptists] are a Protestant group who most reflect our traditional Reformed background and hold, as our forefathers did, to the doctrines of grace, justification by faith alone, the authority of Scripture and the priesthood of all believers." [Chris Taffanstedt, taken from his article : A Primer on Baptist History: The True Baptist Trail]

    "Baptists are Protestants. I know there are some Baptists out there who don't believe we are Protestants, but the rejection of this truth betrays a bapto-centric bias and ignores history.

    ...the first Baptists were in fact Separatists who adopted confessor's baptism. And by the 1640s, the mode of their baptism reflected the New Testament practice of full immersion.

    And as good Protestants, we ultimately stand where we stand, not because otheers stand there as well, but because we believe the Spirit still speaks through His Word to guide Christ's people on the narrow way."

    [By Nathan Finn, taken from his article called Baptists and the Reformation]
     
  2. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn Well-Known Member
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    [Another take by Nathan Finn, taken from A Better Paradigm for the Study of Baptist History?, pp. 18-19]

    “This third approach to the question of Baptist origins might be called a “convergence approach.” A convergence approach attempts to get over the “either/or” divide among historians by totally reframing the question: what are the sources of the modern Baptist movement? This approach also attempts to recognize the strengths in each of the other two theories (and their sub-theories) while rejecting some of those theories’ weaknesses.

    “According to the convergence approach, there are multiple “tributaries” that flow into the “river” of 17th century English Baptists. The first tributary is the English Separatist tributary. This makes sense as the starting point because all existing paradigms concede that the organic roots of the first Baptists are found in the English Separatism of the 1600’s; regardless of other influences, in a very real sense both General and Particular Baptists were Separatists who adopted believers’ baptism by full immersion. It is possible to affirm Separatist origins without negating the possibility of other influences.

    “A second tributary is the Continental Anabaptists, who both General and Particular Baptists were in contact with, though the extent of this contact is debated by historians. But even if the literal contact is less than some suspect, the earliest English Baptists were certainly aware of the existence of immersionist Anabaptists, both on the Continent and in England. And they were aware that, by adopting immersion, they were adopting a decidedly “Anabaptist” practice with negative political and social repercussions. It is possible to affirm Anabaptist influence without having to prove an organic link between Baptist and Anabaptists, though there may well be such a link.

    “A third tributary included pre-1525 immersionist groups. Even most noncontinuationists concede that there has been any number of baptistic groups that have emerged during church history, some of which were evangelical in their convictions. The earliest English Baptists were aware of these groups and recognized that their adoption of immersion was not a recent innovation. It is possible to affirm that 17th century Baptists are part of a larger immersing tradition that has appeared
    from time to time in church history without being theologically committed to a continualist approach.”
     
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  3. Squire Robertsson

    Squire Robertsson Administrator
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    I go with door number 3 convergence.
     
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