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Featured The New and True Exodus....In Jesus....Central Gospel Truth

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by Iconoclast, Dec 20, 2017.

  1. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    A central theme in the OT. was the great redemption and deliverance in which God raised up a Mediator to lead His people out of bondage toward the promise land.

    Moses himself spoke of another who would come;

    15 The Lord thy God will raise up unto thee a Prophet from the midst of thee, of thy brethren, like unto me; unto him ye shall hearken;

    16 According to all that thou desiredst of the Lord thy God in Horeb in the day of the assembly, saying, Let me not hear again the voice of the Lord my God, neither let me see this great fire any more, that I die not.

    17 And the Lord said unto me, They have well spoken that which they have spoken.

    18 I will raise them up a Prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee, and will put my words in his mouth; and he shall speak unto them all that I shall command him.

    Moses was a type of Christ. So was the first Exodus a type of the full final deliverance found in Jesus.
     
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  2. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    A clear illusion to this truth is found when Paul addresses the Corinthians who were mostly ingrafted gentiles....

    1 Corinthians 10King James Version (KJV)
    10 Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea;

    2 And were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea;

    3 And did all eat the same spiritual meat;

    4 And did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ.

    5 But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness.

    6 Now these things were our examples, to the intent we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted.

    7 Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.

    8 Neither let us commit fornication, as some of them committed, and fell in one day three and twenty thousand.

    9 Neither let us tempt Christ, as some of them also tempted, and were destroyed of serpents.

    10 Neither murmur ye, as some of them also murmured, and were destroyed of the destroyer.

    11 Now all these things happened unto them for examples: and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.

    The Ot saints were called Fathers to these Gentiles...
    There is a link here......to the NT ingrafted saints.
     
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  3. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    At the Transfiguration;

    lk9
    30 And behold, two men talked with Him, who were Moses and Elijah, 31 who appeared in glory and spoke of His decease which He was about to accomplish at Jerusalem.

    from Vincents word studies;

    Decease ( ἔξοδον )

    The Rev. retains the word of the A. V., though it has, to modern ears, a somewhat formal sound. No word, however, could more accurately represent the original, which is compounded of ἐξ , out of, and ὁδός , a journeying; and thus corresponds to the Latin decessus, a going away, whence the word decease. The Greek word is familiar to us as exodus, applied principally to the migration of the Hebrews from Egypt, and thus used at Hebrews 11:22, departing. In the mouth of Christ it covers the ideas both of death and ascension. Peter uses it of his own death (2 Peter 1:15, where see note).

    He should accomplish ( ἔμελλεν πληροῦν )

    Better, as Rev., was about to accomplish. “Accomplish,” or “fulfilis very significant with reference to Christ's death. Moses and Joshua had begun an exodus from Egypt, but had not accomplished the going out of God's people from this present world. See Hebrews 3:18; Hebrews 4:8.
     
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  4. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Here are a series of excerpts from an article called;
    The New and Greater Exodus: The Exodus Pattern in the New Testament | Preaching Source

    The Exodus Pattern in the Old Testament


    The use of Exodus as a pattern of deliverance is common in the Old Testament.[10] The account of Joshua’s crossing of Jordan is full of elements designed to recall the Red Sea crossing.[11] “At one time,” writes Daube, “I planned to, write on PATTERNS of deliverance in the Bible. . . . I soon discovered that there was none remotely comparable to the exodus.”[12] The affirmation that “Yahweh delivered his people from Egypt,” repeated in every age and in various contexts became “Israel’s original confession.”[13]

    Exodus, though history in a sense is really “an exposition of the meaning of history for Israel,” ‘a statement of “Israel’s faith.”[14]

    Isaiah described Yahweh’s advent again and again “in language drawn from the Exodus (e.g. 43:19-20; 48:21; 52:11-12).” He believed “Israel’s first redemption will be repeated with even greater wonders.” His theology was “everywhere rooted deep in the sacred tradition.”[15]


    One thing is certain: “the major portion of the vocabulary used to express the saving work of God in Christ is drawn from the Exodus event.”[22] Such New Testament words as redemption, redeem, deliver, deliverance, ransom, purchase, slavery, and freedom entered the religious vocabulary of Israel through the Exodus event. Evidences of the use of the pattern can be found in the Gospels (especially Matthew and John), in the book of Acts, in the epistles (especially 1 and 2 Corinthians and Hebrews), and in Revelation. The pattern is discernible in the stories of the infancy, ministry, and death of Christ. We see it in the identification of John the Baptist and in the preaching of the gospel. We will note this influence under four major headings which correspond to the essentials of the Exodus pattern (see above).
     
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  5. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Many passages in the New Testament reflect the Exodus pattern in the proclamation of deliverance. First, there are those passages which speak of sin as spiritual slavery; the Exodus pattern lies behind this concept either consciously or unconsciously. Jesus said, “every one who makes a habit of committing sin is a slave to sin” (John 8:34, my translation). Paul told the Galatians, “Formerly . . . you were in bondage to beings that by nature are no gods” ( Gal. 4:8, RSV; cf. 1 Cor. 12:2 ).

    Second, the same can be said with more reason when salvation is spoken of ,s deliverance. Only a sampling of passages makes this clear: But now we are discharged from the law, dead to that which held us captive, so that we serve not under the old written code but in the new life of the spirit” (Rom. 7:6, RSV). “Sin shall no longer lord it over you” (Rom. 6:14, my translation). The eternal Lamb is he “who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his blood and made us a kingdom, priests to his God and Father” (Rev. 1:5b-6a, RSV) . “For freedom Christ has set us free” (Gal. 5:1a, RSV).

    Third, the new status of the believer with God is clearly related to the Exodus pattern. The Israelites were delivered out of Egypt, not just to relieve their sufferings, but to install them as God’s own people. So also the believer is delivered from sin, not just to escape punishment (ind misery, but that he might become the son of God and be a part of the people of God. The greatest of all New Testament chapters – Romans 8 – makes this clear. “For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set me free from the law of sin and death” ( v. 2, RSV ) . “If Christ is in you . . . your spirits are alive . . .” (v. 10, RSV). “For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the spirit of sonship. When we cry, ‘Abba! Father!’ it is the Spirit himself bearing witness with our spirit that we are the children of God, and if children, then heirs, heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ” (vv. 15-17a RSV).


    Some have claimed to never hear of such teaching??? Looks as if it is central to gospel proclamation however.
     
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  6. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Jesus is the new Moses; he is also the greater Moses. The comparison is there, but so is the contrast. “The law,” John wrote, “was given through the mediation of Moses; grace and truth came into being by the work of Jesus Christ” (John 1:17, my translation). Moses was a faithful attendant in the house of God; his task was to testify of the “things that were to be spoken later” (Heb. 3:5; RSV). Christ was a son over the whole house, including Moses, and incomparably greater than Moses. He was so much more worthy of honor than Moses as the builder of a house has more honor than the house he builds (Heb. 3:3). “Moses was able to seal the covenant only with the blood of calves and goats; Christ is the mediator of a new covenant sealed in his own blood.”[37]
     
  7. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    The language of Exodus is used when Peter speaks of his readers as a “royal priesthood” and a “holy nation” (1 Pet. 2:9, cf. Exod. 19:6).

    The clearest juxtaposition of the new and old people of God is found in 1Corinthians 10:1-22. Paul spoke of the wilderness generation as “our fathers,” i.e., the fathers of all Christians. He spoke of their sins and punishments as being written for the warning of those “upon whom the end of the ages has come” (v. 11). Paul clearly thought all Christians, including Gentile believers, are the true successors of the wilderness generation and turn heirs of the privileges and responsibilities of being the people of God.

    The clearest exposition of the concept of Christians as the new covenant people of God is found in the book of Hebrews. Both the likenesses and unlikenesses are stressed. The privileges and responsibilities of the new people of God are infinitely superior to those of the old people of God. The new Covenant is already in force, established by the once-for-all sacrifice of Christ. It consists of: (1) the implanting of the law in the minds and hearts of Christians so that they will spontaneously know and love the will of God; (2) a personal and unmediated knowledge of God; and (3) the complete blotting out of sins.[ref]F. F. Bruce, The Epistle to the Hebrews (Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1964), pp. 172-75. The writer points out that the Old Testament heroes of faith died without receiving the things promised “that apart from us they should not be made perfect” (Heb. 11:40b, RSV).
     
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  8. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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  9. Martin Marprelate

    Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    Thank you, Icon! :) Excellent insight!
    One of my main hermeneutical principles is that we should seek to find Christ everywhere in the Bible- John 5:39, 46; Luke 24:25:27).
    Exactly so. Moses could take the people out of Israel, but he couldn't bring them into the promised land, but in Christ, God 'has delivered us from the power of darkness and conveyed us into the kingdom of the Son of His love' (Colossians 1:13-14).
     
    #9 Martin Marprelate, Dec 21, 2017
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  10. kyredneck

    kyredneck Well-Known Member
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    I'll edit that for you:

    "Moses could take the people out of Egypt (the house of bondage), but he couldn't bring them into the promised land..."

    Moses and Aaron both were refused entry into the promised land for the same reason all the others (except Joshua and Caleb) were refused entry - unbelief.

    There's also a type there in that Moses, as representing the law covenant, thus typifying all those who clung to the old covenant, could not enter into (actually were cast out of) the Kingdom of God (what the promised land typifies).
     
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  11. Martin Marprelate

    Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    Thank you. :)
    Can't quite agree with all of this though. 'And Moses indeed was faithful......' (Hebrews 3:5).
    Moses is also one of the heroes of faith in Hebrews 11:23-29.
     
    #11 Martin Marprelate, Dec 21, 2017
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  12. David Kent

    David Kent Well-Known Member
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    The reformation could also be an Exodus. The church had been in bondage to the papal Antichrist for centuries till God used Luther and others to lead the true church out, Revelation 10
     
  13. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    In isa43:16,17......the first Exodus is referenced.....but then verse 18 says.....do not remember the former things,nor consider the things of old...
    Behold....I will do a new thing.....now it say spring forth...shall you not know it?
    In the other. We were directed no longer to look back to the first Exodus
    I understand the idea you offer....however this thread is about the biblical Exodus
     
  14. kyredneck

    kyredneck Well-Known Member
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    Perhaps you should go back and do some review:

    12 And Jehovah said unto Moses and Aaron, Because ye believed not in me, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therefore ye shall not bring this assembly into the land which I have given them.
    23 And Jehovah spake unto Moses and Aaron in mount Hor, by the border of the land of Edom, saying,
    24 Aaron shall be gathered unto his people; for he shall not enter into the land which I have given unto the children of Israel, because ye rebelled against my word at the waters of Meribah. Nu 20
     
  15. Jerome

    Jerome Well-Known Member
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    Discussion from a few years ago led by DBTS's David Doran evaluating this recently cooked up 'New Exodus Theology':

    A leading proponent is Rikki Watts of Alphacrucis College:

    Alphacrucis College (Assemblies of God) Parramatta, Australia - Theology Faculty
     
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  16. Martin Marprelate

    Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    All very true. But they do not negate the texts which I referenced in Hebrews 11:
    By faith Moses......refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter. v.24.
    By faith he forsook Egypt.... v.27.
    By faith he kept the Passover..... v.28.
     
  17. kyredneck

    kyredneck Well-Known Member
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    So, you no longer disagree.

    You now agree that "Moses and Aaron both were refused entry into the promised land for the same reason all the others (except Joshua and Caleb) were refused entry - unbelief."
     
  18. Martin Marprelate

    Martin Marprelate Well-Known Member
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    I don't agree that ' Moses, as representing the law covenant, thus typifying all those who clung to the old covenant, could not enter into (actually were cast out of) the Kingdom of God (what the promised land typifies).' Moses and Aaron are Old Testament saints, and are most certainly in the 'better, that is, a heavenly country' (Hebrews 11:15). Their many sins are doubtless forgiven them by grace. Where I do agree is that Moses serves as a type of the Law, which cannot, of itself bring anyone into the true Promised land (Romans 8:3).
     
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  19. Iconoclast

    Iconoclast Well-Known Member
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    Here Jerome has a keen eye for following those who never get it right.
    Notice....the person trying to explain the teaching not only does not understand it at all suggesting it comes from fragments from Isaiah...but then he tries to demonize it by playing the old replacement theology card:Cautious:Cautious
     
  20. Jerome

    Jerome Well-Known Member
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    New Exodus theorist Rikki Watts, in an article he wrote for The Gospel Coalition:

    thegospelcoalition.org/article/you-asked-did-mark-fumble-his-opening-quotation/
     
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